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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 








Darlington jMemorial Library- 




18 4 7. 



PHILAE^LPlilA; 



C. C^. SOWBXt, 165 NORTH THIRD IS^^ISfiT. 



C. G. SOW EB,I 

BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 
JVo. 165 JVorth Third Street, below Fme, 

FHZI.ADEI.PBXA, £^ 

Has constantly for sale, at the lowest pri% , a well selected stock of 

SCHOOL BOOKS, BLANK BOOKS; 

AND V 

STATIONERY. 

ie respectfully invites the attention of Teachers, Merchants, and others, to 

his Stock of 

SCHOOL BOOKS, 

Comprising all in general use ; also their assortment of ^^ 

BLANK BOOKS. 

Including every description of Account,. Record, and Memora?idum Books. I 

STA-MONERY. 

Writing and Wrapping Papers, Steel Pens of every description and{ /ice, .^ 

Quills, Ink, Sand, Wafers, Lead Pencils, Slates and Pencils, \ | 

CURTAIN PAPERS, Bonnet Boards, &c. ] 

All kinds of Blank and Printed Books Bound in the best style, and most t 

reasonable lerms. 



i 



Booksellers, Merchants, Teachers, and School Directors, supj>MBB^ low as 
at any store in the City. Orders promptly attended |X0. 



BROTHER JONATHAN'S ,3 

• ALMANAC, • mi^~^l 

FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1 

1847: 

Being the Third \fter T^eap If ear; 

CQ^TTAINING 365 DAYS, .] 

And after the Fourth of July, the Seventy-first of American Independence. \ 

ARRANGED AFTER THE SYSTEBT^' OF THE OERBSAN ALXKKANACS. \ 

CONTAINING ; 

The Rising, Setting, and Eclipses of the Sun and Moon ; the Phases, Signs, , 
and Southings of the Moon ; the Aspects of the Planets ; with the Rising, \ 
Setting, and Southing of the most conspicuous Planets and Fixed Stars ; \ 
the times of High Water at Philadelphia; the Equation of Time, and other ^ 
Miscellanies, &c., &;c. 

1 
CAREFULLY CALCULATED ^ 

FOR THE LATITUDE OF PENNSYLVANIA AND OHIO, \ 

BUT WILL SERVE FOR 1 

MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, AND THE ADJOINING STATES, WITHOUT MATERIAL 

ALTERATION. , 

. BV \ 

SETH SMITH. i 

THE CALCULATION OF THIS ALMANAC IS MADE TO MEAN OR CLOCK TIME, EXCEPT I 

THE RISING AND SETTING OF THE SUN, WHICH ARE FOR SOLAR ;■ 

OR APPARENT TIME. 'i 



PHILADELPHIA: 

C..G. SQWER, 165 NORTH THIRD STREET, 



Explanation of Characters in this Almanack. 



New Moon. N^Jf First Quarter. ^^ Full Moon. V||j^ Last Quarter 
The Twelve Constellations in the Zodiac. 



^ Aries, or Ram. 
(^ Taurus, or bull. 
f^ Gemini, or twins. 
►^ Cancer, or crab-fish. 



(ff Leo, the lion. 
31 Virgo, or virgin. 
^ Libra, or balance. 
c|g Scorpio, orscorpion. 



The Planets and their Qualities 



1^ Sagittarius, or bowman. 
i^ Capricornus, or goat. 
^ Aquarius, or waterman. 
SS Pisces, the fishes. 



t) Saturn, cold, dry. 
4 Jupiter, warm, moist, 
tf Mars, hot, dry. 
Sun, fiery, dry. 



$ Venus, moist, warm. 
^ Mercury, warm, dry. 
j) Moon* cold, moist, changing. 
^ Herschel, hot, dry, moist, changing. 



Aspects and other Characters. 



Conjunction c/ 
Opposition cf 
Trine A 

Quartile D 



Sextile * 

Moon's ascen. \j 
Moon's desc. r\ 
Good cupping ^ 

Chronological Cycles. 



Mooninapo. or perigee 1) 
h. and m. hours and min. 
Semi Sextile ss. 



Dragon's head ^ 
Seven stars 7* 
Earth © 



Dominical Letters C Koman Indiction 5 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 5 Julian Period 6560 

Epact 14 The Jewish Era com. Sep. 21 with 5608 

Solar Cycle 8 The Moham.Erabeg.Dec. 20 with 1264 

MOVEABLE FEASTS. 



Septuagesima Sunday Jan. 31 

Sexagesima Sunday Feb. 7 

Quinqua. .or Shrove Sun. Feb. 14 

Shrove Tuesday Feb. 16 

Ash Wed.orlstday ofLentFeb. 17 

Quadragesima, 1st S. in L. Feb. 21 

Palm Sunday Mar. 28 

Good Friday April 2 



Easter Sunday April 4 

Low Sunday April 11 

Rogation Sunday May 9 

Ascen. Day, or Holy Thurs. May 13 

Whit Sunday May 23 

Trinity Sunday May 30 

Corpus Christi June 3 

Advent Sunday Nov. 28 



Ember Days. 
The 25th of March the 26th of May, the 22th of Sep. and 15th of Dec. 
CARDINAL POINTS. 

Vernal Equinox, the 21st March, 12 o'clock, 33- min., in the morning. 

Summer Solstice, the 21st June, 9 " 18 " " afternoon. 

Autumnal Equinox, the 23d Sept 11 " 21 " " morning. 

Winter Solstice, the 22d Dec 5 " 4 " " morning. 



The Eclipses for the Year 1847. 

This year there will be two Eclipses of the Sun, and two of the Moon. 

1. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, March 31st. 1847: occurring in the afternoon: therefore invisible. 

At Bostoni the Moon will rise about 16 minutes before the end of the eclipse. 

2. A total Eclipse of the Sun, April 15th 1847, invisible in ./Jmerica. The Conjunction at 1 hour 

21 minutes in the morning. 

3. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, Sep. 24th 1847, ar 9 hours, 32 min. in the morning, invisible 

4. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, October 9th 1847: invisible iu America. 



i.<-^. 


4 


Columbia 


18 


Luzerne 


4 


Dauphin 


18 


Mifflin 


4 


Lancaster 


18 
18 


Nortlmmlierland 


4 


Northampton 


Perry 


4 


Wayne . 


18 


York 


4 


Adams ' 


S?5 

25 


Cumberland 


11 


Bedford 


Franklin 


11 


Centre 


25 


"•.ntJnrrdon 


11 


^Venango 





of an anni, 

lowing toast: " . 

sticks by when all otnt. . 



Voltaire said— "I have a friend who .. 
rector in the Bank of France, who writes to me 
when they are going to make money plenty and 
make stock rise, and then I give orders to my 
broker 'to sell: and he writes to me when they 
are going to make stock fall, and then 1 write to 
my broker to buy: and thus at a hundred leagues 
from Paris, and without moving from mj chair 
T make money. ' * - 

Oh, my dear, sir,' said a poor sufferer to a 
ist, 'that is the second wrong tooth you have 
'A out?' ' Very sorry, sir,' said the' blunder- 
operator, 'but as there were only three 
1 1 began, I'm sure to be right next time. 



The First Month, or JANUARY— 1847, 



^^^^ Remarkable Days ^^^^ ^"^'^ Moon's Aspects of Planets ^U^ 
Days. ^ ' Wafer. R.SfS. Signs, other Miscellanies. l^jS 



j . Sun Moon )^ ^ 

IRises^Sets. South.\°a 



Frid 
Satur 



1 New Year 

2 Abel, Seth 



2 
2 35 



5 15 

6 12 



v€l2 
)'^24 



"^Sun in per. 
'Ariet. s 7 8 



7 23 
7 23 



4 37 morn 
4 37 12 32 



1.) Sunday. 



Day's length 9 hours 14 minutes. 



Sund 
Mond 
Tues 



3 Enoch 

4 Methusalem 

5 Simon 



3 9 

3 42 

4 14 



(^ 71$ sets 5 
4^ 19|cf rises4 29 



5j7 23 

5,7 22 



4 37 
4 38 

/J. QQ 



1 20(22 

2 6123 
P 50124 



,2 sets o 



vVed 
Thur 
Frid 
Satur 



^.) Serenus 

24 Ember day 

25 Victor 

26 Nestor 

27 Leander 



o 58 

8 11 

9 32 

10 46 

11 48 
morn 

12 36 



Matt. 4. 



12 4 

1 6 

2 2 

2 54 

3 40 

4 22 
4 58 



^10 
^23 

m 6 

^^ 18 



DayVlength 10 hou.. ^« 



1]. so 6 11 
^ rises 3 54 



1416 365 24 
14 6 355 25 
14 6 34 5 26| 
14 6 32 5 28 
I'ite 315 291 



'ninutes. 

~5~5079 

6 4210 

7 3411 

8 2412 



9.) 2d S unday in Lent. 

Sund 128 Justus I 1 12| 



Matt. 
5 311<^2 



■" Wm. 



Has 




MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon the 1st, at 9 o'clock, 42 minutes h 
morning-. 

Last Quarter the 9 th, at one o'clock, 
the afternoon. "i^^ 

New Moon the 16th, at 7 o'clock, 4f^- 
the afternoon. O^ 

First Quarter the 23d, at 11 o'clock, 17 g\ 
the morning. , 

Full Moon the 31st, at 3 o'clock 28 minuiS ^ 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

The 1st, & 2d clear; 3d, cloudy ^ 4th chanj 
ble, 5lh 6th 7th, clear and cold; 8th and 9th, cloi 
10th 11th 12th and 13th, clear and cold; 14th 15th 1 
and 17tli, cloudy witU snow at intervals; r8th, cle. 
19th 20ih cloudy; 21st 22d 23d changeable but mile, 
24th, sncw; 25th and 26th, cloudy; 27th, clear an 
cold; 28th and 29th, miU and clear: 30 and 31 cloud- 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common P)// 

Berks 4 1 Warren ^. 

^ambria 4 | Tioga 

H ahanon 



EBRUARY— 1847. 



cts of Planets Sf 


^i 


Sun 


Moon 




icr Miscellanies. 


BJS 


Rises Sf Sets. 


South. 


5^ 


ets6 9 


14 


7 


5 


12 4720 


ises 4 12 


14 


6 59 


5 1 


1 30'21 


1 apogee 


14 


6 58 


5 2 


2 1322 


o7 17 


14 


6 57 


5 3 


2 5523 


reat. H. L. S. 


14 


6 55 


5 5 


3 37 24 


-ts 6 29 


14 


6 54 


5 6 


4 2025 



Day's length 10 hours 14 minutes 


. 


0. 7 55 


14 


6 53 


5 7 


5 5^6 


.•ion s. 8 30 


14 


6 52 


5 8 


5 53 


27 


riuss 918 


15 


6 51 


5 9 


6 42 


28 


>30 n 


15 


6 50 


5 10 


7 35 


29 


on so 12 9 


15 


6 48 


5 12 


8 31 


30 


ses 4 5 


15 


6 47 


5 13 


9 28 


31 


•eat. H. L. S. 


15 


6 46 


5 14 


10 2Q 


1 



Day's length 10 hours 30 minutes. 



iouth 6 43 


14 


6 45 


5 15 


11 25 


2 


%l)\n perigee 
If^insup.c/O 


14 


6 44 


5 16 


12 22 


3 


14 


6 42 


5 18 


1 19 


4 


5et« 5 22 


14|6 41 


5 19 


2 14 


5 


ID 


14'6 40 


5 20 


3 9 


6 


D Orion s 9 49 


146 39 


5 21 


4 3 


7 


? Kr; 


146 37 


5 23 


4 56 


8 



Has 28 Days. 




MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter the 8tli, al 8 o'clock, 38 minutes in 
the morning, 

New Moon the 15th, at 6 o'cL ck, 25 minutes in 
the morning. 

First Quarter the 21st, al 10 o'clock, 58 minutes in 
the afternoon. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

1 he 1st & 2d clear; 3d 4th & 5tl) cloudy with snow' 
6lh and 7th clear: 8th snow; 9th 10 & 11th change- 
able & cold; 12th 13th, snow; 14lh 15lh mild & cl ar: 
16th & irth, cloudy; 18th cold and clear: 19th 20lh & 
21st, variable: 22d, ra'm: 23d &. 24th, clear and cold: 
25th 26th & 27th, cloudy; 28 ih clear. 

Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 



Chester 




Bucks 


. 8 


Clearfield 


, 1 


Crawford 


8 


Erie 




Jefferson 


8 


Juniata 




Monroe 


15 


Susquehanna 




Montgomery 


15 


Pike 




Union 


15 


Lehigh 




M'Kean 


15 


Lycoming 




Washington 


15 


Somerset 




Westmoreland 


15 


Clarion 




Delaware 


22 


Bradford 


8 


Potter 


22 



A BIT OF REAL IRISH. 

A car-driver, named Paddy Geraghty, was, 
some time ago, brought before the Magi strates 
of the Head Police Office, Dublin, for having 
used threatening language to a Mr. Elles, of Ham- 
mond Lane. The Magistrates, on hearing the 
statement of the complainant, directed Geraghty 
to give security, himself in £20, that he would 
keep'the peace. 

Paddy having been ushered by the bailifTinto 
the office of the bondsigner, or person who is to 
see that the bail-bond is executed, the following 
dialogue loolr place when the bond was prepared: 



Clerk.-The condition of this bond, Geraghty, 
is, that you will keep the peace for seven years? 

Gexaghty. — (scratching his head.) Fot seven 
years 1 

■ Clerk. — Yes, for seven years; and to all his 
Majesty's subjects. 

Geraghty. — To all his Majesty's subjects ! 
Good God ! What is that for ? 

Clerk. — Why it seems to be a great hardship 
on you to keep the peace. 

Geraghty. — Is it to every one in Dublin? 

Clerk. — Ay, and to every one in Ireland, too. 

Geraghty. — In all Ireland. 

Clerk. — ^Yes ; in England and Scotland, a-lso. 

Geraghty. — In England and Scotland ! Oh ! 
that is on account of the union, I suppose ; bad 
luck to it ! 

Clerk. — And, likewise, in all his Majestys do- 
minions. 

Geraghty. — Is it # home and abroad ? 

Clerk. — Yes, certainly. 

Geraghty. — Why certainly! by St. Patrick, 
I'll never sign it. 

Pat was here reminded that if he did not con- 
form to the order of the Magistrates, he would be 
committed, on which he reluctantly took up his 
pen to make the mark to the bond, exclaiming at 
the same time, ' Oh! boys, isn't this dreadful for 
nothing at all !' 

When the bond was signed, Geraghty 
shrugged up his shoulders, saying to the Clerk, 
with an air of sarcastic triumph, * Well, sW, you 
have done yer best. Thank God, you can do 
no more. 

Clerk. — Oh! we don't want to do any more. 
You are now bound to keep the peace to all his 
Majesty's subjects. 

Geraghty,. — (looking at the Clerk, whilst at 
the same time he was untying the whip that was 
across his shoulders) To kape the pace to all his 
Majesty's subjects! Oh! then, by the powers of 
man, the first fellow I meet that is not his 
Majesty^ s subject, I'll make his head smoke. 

CHARITY. 

B6l4*ire not each accusing tongue. 

As most weak persons do ; 
But still believe that story wrong 

Which ought not to be true. 



1# 



n^eek 
Days. 


Remarkable Days. 


High 
Water. 


Moon 
R.SfS. 


Moon's 
Signs. 


Aspects of Planets 4* 
o</«er HAiscellanies. 


^i Sun 
ril Rises ^ Sets. 


Moun 
South. 


n 


Mond 


1 St. David 


1 47 


6 4' 


m 6,^::^? sets 7 15 


13 


6 26 


5 34 


morn 


17 


Tues 


2 Chad 


;2 20 


rises 


<ai^i8 


^g^]) in apogee 


12 


6 24 


5 36 


12 11 


18 


Wed 


3 Samuel 


2 50 


7 34 


?r>si 


c^ rises 3 46 


12 


6 23 


5 37 


12 53 


19 


Tliur 


4 Adrianus 


3 21 


8 32 


^ 11 


^iricQ, 


12 


6 22 


5 38 


1 36 


20 


Frid 


5 Frederick 


3 51 


9 26 


Jg'^ I^J 


2|. sets 12 33 


12 


6 21 


5 39 


2 19 


21 


Satur 


6 Fridolin 


'4 28 


10 23 


« 5 


D rises 6 14 


12 


6 19 


5 41 


3 3 


22 



10.) 


3d Sunday after Lent. 




Luke 11. Day's let 


igil 


11 hours 24 minutes. 


Sund 


7 Perpetua 


4 59 


11 21 


<^18 


Sirius so 7 36 


11 


6 18 


5 42 


3 49 


23 


Moad 


8 Philomon 


4 42 


morn 


<S^ 4 


Castor so 8 18 


11 


6 17 


5 43 


4 37 


24 


Tues 


9 Prudence 


6 32 


12 17 


#^17 


/Jg^^ in perihel. 
\5L¥scts7 36n 


11 


6 15 


5 45 


5 26 


25 


Wed 


10 Rosina 


7 37 


1 13 


m 1 


11 


6 14 


5 46 


6 19 


26 


Thur 


11 Ernestus 


8 49 


2 8 


^15 


^ rises 3 47 


10 


6 13 


5 47 


7 14 


21 


Frid 


12 Gregory 


10 27 


2 57 


^ 


c/ c? 3), c/ ? W 


10 


6 11 


5 49 


8 10 


28 


Satur 


13 Macedon < 


^1 41 


3 44 


^15 


2; sets 12 24 


10,6 10 


5 50 


9 6 


1 



11.) 4th Sunday after Lent. 



John 6. 



Day's length ti hours 42 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



14 Zachriah 

15 Christopher 

16 Cyprianus 

17 St. Patrick 

18 Anshelmus 

19 Joseph 

20 Matrona 



12 38 


4 28 


>g» 


1 26 


5 10 


35 15 


2 9 


sets 


9^. 


2 49 


7 26 


ff«15 


3 30 


8 37 


9^.2^ 


4 10 


9 48 


^13 


4 52 


10 53 


^27j 



^ great, elong. E. 
/^IkD in perigee 

^ great. H. L. N. 
$ sets 7 59 



9 


6 9 


5 51 


10 3 


9 


6 7 


5 53 


11 


9 


6 6 


5 54 


11 56 


9 


6 5 


5 55 


12 52 


8 


6 3 


5 57 


1 48 


8 


6 2 


5 58 


2 44 


8 


6 1 


5 59 


3 39 



12.) 5th Sunday after Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length 12 hours 2 minutes. 



Sund 


21 Benedict 


5 31 


11 53 


7^*10 




7 


5 59 


6 1 


4 34 


Mond 


22 Paulina 


6 34 


morn 


^23 


^ rises 3 23 U 


7 


5 58 


6 2 


5 28 


Tues 


23 Eberhard 


7 37 


12 49 


m 6 


s^"^ rises 5 6 


7 


5 57 


6 3 


6 20 


Wed 


24 Gabriel 


8 52 


1 37 


H^18 


6 


5 55 


6 5 


7 9 


Thur 


25 A.ofB.V.M 


10 11 


2 20 


<fir 


Procyon so 7 18 


6 


5 54 


6 6 


7 57 


Frid 


26 Emanuel 


11 11 


2 59 


'ffis 


Regul. so 9 42 


6 


5 53 


6 7 


8 42 


Satur 


27 Gustavus 


morn 


3 32 


<«r2i 


$ sets 8 16 


6 


5 51 


6 9 


9 27 



13.) Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 12 hours 20 minutes. 



Sund 
Mond 
Tues 
Wed 



28 Gideon 

29 Eustatius 

30 Guido 

31 Detalaus 



12 2 


4 4 


M 3 


12 43 


4 35 


^ 15 


1 20 


5 4 


^27 


1 1 53 


5 31 


)^ 8 



2]. sets 1 1 34 
j) in apogee 



g; ^T) rises 4 45 



'Moon eel 



ip. 



5 


5 50 


6 10 


10 10 


5 


5 49 


6 11 


10 52 


5 


5 48 


6 12 11 34l 


4 


5 46 


6 14 


morn 



Has 31 Days. 



11 




MOON'S PHASES 

Full Moon the 1st at 10 o'clock 8 min. in the aft'n 

Last Quarter the 9th, at 11 o'clock 38 min in tie 
afternoon. 

New Moon the 16th, at 4 o'clock 10 minutes in the 
afternoon. 

First Quarter the 23(1, at 12 o'clock, 40 minutes in 
the afternoon. 

Full Moon the 31st at 4 o'clock 16 min. in the aft'n. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

1st, cloudy: 2d & 3d, changeable; 4th clear & colda 
5tb & 6th, snow and rain: 7th 8lh & 9lh changeable.- 
10th & 11th. clear and cold: 12th, cloudy; 13th, clear, 
14th 15tU & 16th, changeable; 17th, stormy; 
18th, 19lh cloudy; 20th north wind, 21st 22d 23d, 
stormy; 24th 251h, clear and cold; 26th 27 & 28th, 
north wind; 29lh, rain: SOtl^& 31st, variable. 



Supreme 


Cowrf.— Philadelphia 


' 15 


Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of CommonPleas, 


Beaver 


1 


Armstrong 


15 


Fayette 


1 


Green 


15 


Philadelphia 


1 


Schuylkill 


22 


Warren 


1 


Alleghany 


22 


Uutler 


8 


Indiana 


22 


Tioga 


8 


Mercer 


22 


Venango 


8 ICambria 


29 



Making it an object. — Dan Marble tells a 
good story of a Yankee who recently paid Ar- 
kansas a flying visit. He went out there to 
♦' settle" induced by the representations of a 
man from the State who was on a visit to Con. 
necticut, and who told him he could " make a 
fortin" at once, and that he would make it ah 
object for him if he would move to Arkansas 
immediately and with him. Upon the strength 
of these assertions the Yankee accompanied his 
Arkansa* friend home, but had hardly been in the 
State half a day, when they had a regular rough 
and tumble fight, in which the " Down Easter" 
got the worst of it. We give the Yankee's 



description of the " skrimage" in nearly his own 
words. 

" You see I went out among, the darned 
catamarans and bowy nives becos I was tol4 I 
could make my etarnil fortin in enamost no 
time. The feller that coxed me ofl^, tu, sed 
he'd make it an object for me, and what's more 
sed he'd due the thing that was right and make 
an object of me among his friends and quain* 
lances — sed he'd get me all their custom, tu:— 
Well, afore I'd been among the plaguy heathen 
tu hours the chap that got me off was mor'n 
halfsmashetl on new corn whiskey kicked up 
a row, and finally give me one of the almightiest 
lickin's I ever got since I was born upon airth. 
Why, the lickin Eph Peltingill give me behind 
the school house was new cider and pan cakes 
in comparison. But he made his word good, 
fori was a leetle grain the worse looking object 
arter the fight was over ! — That mumy I seen in 
the old Boston museum was a perfect beauty to 
what I was. When I cum to think over what 
he'd sed — how he'd make an object of me 
among his friends and get me all their custom, 
and so on, I thought the most prudent thing 1 
could du was jest tu pull up stakes and be off 
home, and if ever you catch me out in Rackan- 
saw agin you may split me up into shingle stuff. 
I'm not so fond of bein made an object of and 
gettin custom in that way, particularly tvhen 
custom of that kind is by no means scarce^ 



MAKING THE MOST OF IT. 

The " last best gift" of Victoria to her husband 
is said to be rather ugly in feature. One of the 
Court Journals, however, labors hard to make a 
beauty of the " little dear," as follows: — 

" Her royal highness is a remarkably fine in- 
fant, but not so delicately formed as her sister. 
She has eyes bordering on light blue — a nose 
small, but beautifully rounded — and hair which 
promises to be flaxen." 

If it belonged to common folks, we presume 
the above might be rendered thus. — "A homely 
little squab, with cat's eyes, pug nose, and tow 
head." — Alas for the consistency of this world 
of humbug! 



12 



The Fourth Month, or APRIL— 1847, 



Jf^*^ Remarkable Days 
Days. y 



High 
Water. 



Moon Moon's Aspects of Planets Sf 
R.S^ S. Signs, other Miscellanies. 



^ ^ Sun Moon I, j 

f Rises SfSets. South. FS 



Thur 
Frid 
Satur 



1 Theodore 

2 GoodFri'y, 

3 Ferdinand 



2 24^ 

2 56 

3 33 



rises 

8 19 

9 16 






$ sets 8 30 
^ rises 3 4 



45 6 15 

44|6 16 
5 4216 18 



12 
1 1 

1 47 



17 20 
21 



14.) 


Easter Sunday. 






Mark 16. Day's length 12 hours 38 


minutes 




Sund 


4 Easter Sun. 


4 3 


10 11 


cf?27 


4 sets U 13 


35 41 


6 19 


2 34 


23 


Mond 


5 Easter Mon 


4 40 


11 7 


m 9 


t) rises 4 23 


35 40 


6 20 


3 23 


24 


Tues 


6 Egesippus 


5 22 


morn 


m22 


Spica so 12 27 n 


35 39 


6 21 


4 14 


25 


Wed 


7 Aaron 


6 11 


12 1 


m 5 


Aliothsoll 42 


2 5 37 


6 23 


5 7 


26 


Thur 


8 Dionysius 


7 10 


12 52 


^19 


^gMleg. so 8 51 


2 5 36 
2 5 35 


6 24 


6 1 


27 


Frid 


9 Prochorus 


8 31 


1 37 


^ 3 


Ct/cT]) 


6 25 


6 56 


28 


Satur 


10 Daniel 


9 58 2 21 


^17 


$ sets 8 48 


l|5 33 


6 27 


7 50 


29 



15.) 


1st Sunday after Easter. 




John.20 


Day's len 


gth 12 hours 48 


minutes 




Sund 


11 Julius 


11 15 


3 2 


3S 1 


Alioth so 1 1 26 


1 


5 32 6 28 


8 45 30 


Mond 


12 Eustachius 


12 15 


3 40 


5£ 16 


c/^ 3), 4 so 1049 


1 


5 316 29 


9 39 31 


Tues 


13 Justinus 


1 4 


4 18 


^ 1 


3) in perigee 


1 


5 306 30 


10 341 1 


Wed 


14 Tiberius 


1 49 


sets 


^16 


c/l^]), Sunec.in. 


(k5 286 32 


11 30 


2 


Thur 


15 Olympia 


2 31 


7 21 


^ 1 


jpSlDicf rises 2 44 


•05 276 33 


12 26 


3 


Frid 


16 Calxitus 


3 11 


8 33 


fl^l6 


^©lI'Pol. set 12 25 


^ 


5 266 34 


1 23 


4 


Satur 


17 Rudolph 


4 23 


9 37 


^ 


t) rises 3 38 


co_ 


5 25'6 35 


2 20 


^ 



16.) 


2d Sunday after Easter. 




John 10. Day's length 13 hours 14 


minutes 




Sund 


18 iEneas 


4 34 


10 36 


'If* 14 


Alioth s 10 59 


1 


5 23:6 37 


3 16 


6 


Mond 


19 Ancietus 


.5 18 


11 29 


^28 


Regul. so 8 8 U 


1 


5 22]6 38 


4 10 


7 


Tues 


20 Sulputius 


6 5 


morn 


^B 11 


? sets 9 12 


1 


5 21 6 39 


5 2 


8 


Wed 


21 Adolarius 


7 


12 17 


^^23 


^ in Aphehon 


1 


5 20 6 40 


5 52 


9 


Thur 


22 Cajus 


8 6 


12 57 


<fC 6 


^m^Spicasll 13 
s^2|.sets 1016 


2 


5 19 6 41 


6 39,10 


Frid 


23 St. George 


9 13 


1 34 


<f€18 


2 


5 17a 43 


•7 23(11 


Satur 


24 Albert 


10 23 


2 6 


M 


^ rises 2 28 


2 


5 16,6 44 


8 712 



17.) 3d Sunday after Easte. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 30 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 



25 St. Mark 

26 Cletus 

27 Anastasius 

28 Vetalis 

29 Sybilla 

30 Eutropius 



11 21 


2 37 


^^ 1^ 


morn 


3 7 


^23 


12 7 


3 37 


25^ 5 


12 48 


4 5 


je8^ 17 


1 24 


4 37 


2^29 


1 58 


rises 


mn 



J) in apogee 
Arctur. so. 11 48 
$ sets 9 28 
^ gjreat. elong. W. 
~ "5 rises 2 54 
^Spicasl041 



8 49 

9 32 
4710 14 

10 58 

11 43 
morn 



Has 30 Days. 



13^ 




MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter the 8th, at 10 o'clock 25 minutes in 
the morning. 

. New Moon the 15th, at 1 o'clock, 21 minutes in the 
morning. 

First Quarter the 22d, at 4 o'clock, 8 minutes in 
the morning. 

Full Moon the 30th, at 8 o'clock, 25 min. in the 
morning. . 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

The 1st 2d & 3d pleasant: 4th, 5th variable: 6th 
cloudy: 7th, 8th thunder; 9th tempestuous, winds: 
10th 11th 8i 12th, cloudy, 13th 14th pleasant; 15th & 
16th cloudy: 17 warm rain; 18th & 19th clear: 20th 
rainy. 21st 22d 23d & 24th variable. 25 & 26th clear. 
27th 28th 29th variable. 30th clekr. 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Coiitt of Common Pleas. 


Berks 


5 


Bedford 19- 


Franklin 


5 


Columbia 19 


Lebanon 


5 


Dauphin 19 


Luzerne 


5 


Lancaster 19 


Mifflin 


5 


Northampton 19 


Northumberland 


5 


Wayne 19 


Perry 


5 


Adams 26 


York 


5 


Centre 26 


Crawford 


12 


nucks 26 


Cumberland 


12 Somerset 26 


Huntingdon 


12 Pike , 30 



Philadelphia Jearly Meeting of Orthodox 
Friends, held at Arch Street Meeting House, 3d 
second day in the fourth Month, (the 19th.) 



A street Dialogue early in the Morning. 

' Ain't it precious cold, Bill?' 

« That it is, Tom.' 

' Dont you know how cold it is, Bill'? 

♦ No.' 

' Why, its 40 degrees colder nor yesterday.' 

♦ Degrees? What's a degree, Tom?' 
'Why, Bill, every degree you wants another 

great coat.' 

♦ No wonder, Tom^ then, we feels so precious 
cold.' 



Hard Words. — A gentleman who had kept 
public house for many years, but whose house 
was almost completely hid from the road by 
woods, was one day speaking of the improve- 
ments which he intended to make about his 
premises. " Gentlemen," said he, " I intend 
to open a large revenue from the public high- 
way to my dwelling, to which I shall build a 
condition, that I may be able to detain strag- 
glers in a more hostile manner." 

Capital. — A man in Ohio, well mounted, and 
urging on a drove of fat hogs towards Detroit, 
met a charming lot of little girls, as they were 
returning from school, when one of them, as she 
passed the ' swinish miiltitude,' made a very 
pretty curtsey. 

" Why my. little girl," said the mail, " do you 
curtsey to a whole drove of hogs?" 

" No, sir,' said she, with a most provoking 
smile, ' only to the one on horseback.' 



ELOQUENCE. 

The following is an extract from an oration of 
a gentleman in Missouri, delivered in the meet- 
ing house on the glorious 4lh of July: 

" Fellow citizens- Shouts of victory come up 
from the neighboring mashes — the cry of free- 
dom defens the voice of nature, and all nature 
sings aloud for joy! On this glorious occasion 
I have not words to express the sentiments of 
my mind — when I think of the great doings of 
our posteriors, how tbey licked the British, and 
my father was in the army, and I was not born, 
and my mother warn't courted yet, and the 
country was freed from British slavery by the 
gloriovjs arms of Thomas Jefferson and General 
Jackson. On this day I call upon you to gird on 
your swords and beat your spears into plough- 
shares and cry aloud and spare not. On thistlay 
let the cannons roar aloud — let the flags be waft- 
ed on high — let the gleaming of your swords 
flash in the rays of the sun — let the shouts of 
freedom fill the air — let the trumpit send forth 
its blasting strains — and let the gentleman who 
borrowed my umbrella bring it back again as 
soon as possible!" 



14 



The Fifth Month, or MAY— 1847, 



^^f|i^.;na.^a67eP.,.|^f, 



Moon Moon* s Aspects of Planets Sf ^^ Sun 

R.^S. Signs, other 3^scella7iies. fji& Rises Sf Sets. 



Moon 1^: 
South.p: 



Saturl 1 Phil James I 2 34| 8 eicjg 241$ sets 9 36 | 3|5 816 52\12 31|19 

18.) 4th Sunday after Easter. John 16. Day's length 13 hours 4tt minutes. 



cT rises 2 10 n 
^. sets 9 43 
$ in perihelion 
d'SZj.Arc. so 11 9 
'^t> rises 2 21 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



Sigismund 

Inv.ofCross 

Florianus 

Godart 

St. John Ev 

Domicilla 

Stanislaus 



3 9 

3 46 

4 24 

5 7 

5 53 

6 51 
8 3 



9 3|^ 6 
9 58^19 
10 49^ 2 



11 37 
morn 

12 21 
1 1 



i^l6 
^29 

^27 



6 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 
6 57 

6 58 

7 



1 



20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 



3826 



19.) Rogation Sunday. 



John 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 2 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



_9 Job 

10 Gordianus 

11 Mamertus 

12 Pancratius 

13 Ascen. day 

14 Christian 

15 Sophia 



9 26 

10 45 

11 51 

12 44 

1 31 

2 14 
2 55 



1 



2 12 

2 51 

3 30 

4 11 

sets 
8 20 



^11 

^26 

^.25 

^24 
^ 8 



Spica so 10 6 

$ sets 9 52 

]) in perigee 

^ great. H. L. S. 

^ rises 1 50 
f^2]. sets 9 14 
0i) rises 1 54 



4 59 
4 58 
4 57 
4 56 
4 55 
4 55 
4 54 



7 30 

8 23 

9 17 

10 11 

11 7 

12 3 
1 



27 

28 

29 

30 

1 

2 

3 



20.) 


6th Sunday after Easter. 




John 15. Day's length 


14 hours 14 minutes 




Sund 


16 Perigrine 


3 35 


9 17 


i^22 


Arct.so 10 26 U 


4 


4 53 


7 7 


1 56 


4 


Mond 


17 lodorus 


4 14 


10 8 


m 5 


c/^D 


4 


4 52 


7 8 


2 50 


5 


Tues 


18 Liberius 


4 55 


10 52 


^18 


Alioth so 9 1 


4 


4 51 


7 9 


3 42 


6 


Wed 


19 Dunstan, 


5 28 


11 29 


<fC 1 


$ sets 10 6 


4 


4 50 


7 10 


4 31 


7 


Thur 


20 Tropetus 


6 23 


morn 


^H 


Pollux so 10 7 


4 


4 49 


7 11 


5 18 


8 


Frid 


21 Prudence 


7 12 


12 3 


<f^26 


'^^j. sets 8 53 
sJPc?^ rises 1 31 


4 


4 48 


7 12 


6 3 


9 


Satur 


22 Helen 


8 15 


12 38 


^ 8 


4 


4 48 


7 12 


6 46 


10 



21.) 


Whit Sunday. 






John 14. Day's len 


gth 


14 hours 26 minutes 




Sund 


23 Whit Sund. 


9 22 


1 9 


^^20 


3) in apogee 


4 


4 47 


7 13 


.7 28 


11 


Mond 


24 Esther 


10 27 


1 37 


i^ 1 


Reg. sets 12 38 


4 


4 46 


7 14 


8 10 


12 


Tues 


25 Urbanus 


11 26 


2 6 


2^ 13 


t) rises 1 16 


3 


4 45 


7 15 


8 53 


13 


Wed 


26 Ember day 


morn 


2 37 


^25 


$ sets 10 13 


3 


4 45 


7 15 


9 38 


14 


Thur 


27 Lucianus 


12 14 


3 9 


« 8 


Alt. rises 8 51 


3 


4 44 


7 16 


10 24 


15 


Frid 


28 William 


12 56 


3 46 


<li20 


|l^9gr. H.L.N. 


3 


4 43 


7 17 


11 14 


16 


Satur 


29 MaximiHan 


1 36 


4 26 


m 3 


lglMark.rll35 


34 43 


7 17 


morn 


17 



22.) Trinity Sunday, 

Sutid |§0 Wigand TTSli 
Mondbl Manilius 2 54 



John 8. 



Pay's length 14 hours 36 minutes. 



rises 1^ leizj. sets 8 21 I 314 4217 18|12 5118 

8 46|j(|^ 291c? rises 1 11 n\ 314 41'? 19112 58119 



Has 30 Days. 



IT^ 




Lasl Quarter the 5th, at 11 o'clock 6 minutes in the 
afteHioon. 

|{e\»r Moon the 12th, at 7 o'clock, 52 minutes m 
the afternoon. 

First Quarter the 20th, at 2 o'clock, 31 minutes in 
the afternoon. , 

Full Moon the ?8lh, at 8 o'clpck, 22 minutes in the 



*.^»orning. 



Conjecture of the Weather. 



^ , Vhe 1st, 2d cloudy; 3d rain; 4lh cloudy; 5th, 
o"i» '"> »»«v, oiv. oiv. oVi<]n(TcoKio- 10th clear; 



u j ''ear: 7th, 8th, 9th changeable; 
AT ,^4h showers; ISth*, 14th 15th, clear aud 
loiri, loti|i'« 

20th, 21 gW.. 



17th, 18th, 19th cloudy and 



, oLu o"^> 21st, 22d clear; 23d, 24lh rain 
clear; 26th, 27, ^j.^. ^gih dear; 26th, 27th, 28th 
JOth clear; 31»t i . .- ^g^^^ 3q^j^ clear and pleasant. 

Supreme Coufi.-r 

Court of Quarter Sessions & C^ 



Clairon 

Chester 

Clearfield 

Juniata 

Lehigh 

l^ycoming 

Susquehanna 

Erie 

Bradford 



•Sjinbury 7 

Jeffersof Common Pleas. 

Monroe 

M'Kean J* 

Montgomery i* 



Union 

Westmoreland 

Potter 

Washington 

Delaware 



2f 
24 
24 



Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends, is held 
in Cherry St. Meeting House, 2nd day after the 
2nd First day in the fifth Month, (on the 11th.) 



THE WAY OF THE WORLD. 

"■'Sir, bring, me a good, plain dinner," said a 
melancholy looking individual, to a waiter at 
one of our principalhotels. 

" Yes, sir." 

The dinner was brought and devoured, and 
the stranger called the landlord aside, and thus 
addressed him: 



" I AM KiLT."--Tn the attack on the fort of 
Goyain, by Garwral Nottj during the last cam- 
paign of the Affghan war, the Irish servant of 
her Majesty's 40th had his head grazed by a 
spent ball. It confused him for the moment, 
and he exclaimed, " Och! somebody take my 
piece! I'm kilt— I'm kilt— I'm kilt !" As tliey 
were leading him off, he looked over his should- 
er, and cried out, "Faith, boys, and I don't 
think I'm ki\t entirely yet !" His second thought 
called forth shouts of laughter. 

Conscience vs. Stomach. — A starving man, 
who had committed a theft, was asked by a pi- 
ous person if his conscience had not cried out to 
him, "Forbear?" 

" Alas !" repHed he, " if it did, the cries of my 
stomach were so much louder, that they pre- 
vented me from hearing those of my conscience." 

Principal and Interest. — A gentleman, em- 
inent for his wit, being' hard pressed by one of 
his impatient creditors for the principal and in- 
terest of a debt, long incurred, made the following 
facetious reply to a letter received: 

" Dear Sir— In answer to your obliging favor, 
I must take the liberty to inform you, that at 
present, it is not my interest to pay the prin- 
cipal, neither is it my principle to pay the 
interest. I am> dear Sir, &c." 

THE MOUSE IN LIQUOR. 
Mr. Smith, the reformed drunkard from Lon- 
don, apologized for much of the folly of drunk- 
ards, by the following story of the Cat and the 
Mouse: — 

*^.^," A mouse ranging about a brewery, happen- 

^iiVi ^^'^ '"*° onev^f the vats, was in imminent 

" ^ "" of drowning, and appealed to a cat to 

" Not K ^m^ -pj^g ^.jjj replied, it is a foolish 

To-night yc ^g ^^^^ ^g j ggj yo,j q^,^ i ghall eat 

and but for me,^yge pjteously replied, that fate 

Congress." . ^^an to be drowned in beer. 

Three years aftei out, but the fumes of the 

became'a bankrupt, a.» sneeze; the mouse took 

vieu. The poor dinneie cat called upon mousey 

now a high functionary in .^l, did you not promise 

well. The ways of Provide*, h!' replied mousey, 

derful, and the world's mutaticuor at the timer 

conception or belief. 



18 



The Seventh Month, or JULY--1847, 



Week 
Days. 


T, 7 t7 r» Hisrh Moon 
Remarkable Days. ^J^^ ^ ^ g 


Moon's 
Signs. 


Aspects of Planets Sf 
other Miscellanies. 




Bun 
Rises Sf Sets. 


Moon \r3 « 
South.\^S, 


Thnr 
Frid 
Satur 


1 Theobald 

2 Visit V. M. 

3 Cornelius 


3 59 9 42 ^ 20 $ sets 10 1 

4 40 10 20 S5 5 D in perigee 

5 2410 5Q^ 19d' t) D, c^DO 


3 4 36 7 24 
44 36 7 24 

4 4 37 7 23 


2 2919 

3 23 20 

4 1621 



27.) 


5th Sunday after T 


rinity. 




Luke 5. Day's length 


14 hours 46 


minutes 




Sund 


4 Independ'ce 


6 12 


11 32 


'^ 3 


O in apogee 


4 


4 37 


7 23 


5 8 


22 


Mond 


5 Demetrius 


7 9 


morn 


fP^n 


(^^^^ 


4 


4 38 


7 22 


6 


23 


Tues 


6 John Hubs 


8 25 


12 9 


^ 1 


^crrisesll47 


4 


4 38 


7 22 


6 53 


24 


Wed 


7 Edelburga 


9 50 


12 47 


^15 


2). rises 3 44 


4 


4 38 


7 22 


7 46 


25 


Thnr 


8 Aquila 


11 7 


1 29 


^29 


t, rises 10 22 


5 


4 39 


7 21 


8 39 


2Q 


Frid 


9 Zeno 


12 10 


2 16 


'^IS 


$ sets 9 49 


5 


4 39 


7 21 


9 34 


27 


Satur 


10 Israel 


1 7 


3 7 


5^26 


W DO "^ 


5 


4 40 


7 20 


10 28 


28 



28.) 6th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 15. 



Day's. length 14 hours 40 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



11 Pius 

12 Henry 

13 Margareta 

14 Bonavent 

15 S with in 

16 Hilary 

17 Alexus 



1 43 

2 36 

2 ^7 

3 31 

4 4 

4 36 

5 10 



4 2 
sets 
8 3 

8 38 

9 11 
9 41 

10 9 



m22- 

<gC18 
^ 
^12 

^24 



^ great, elong. E. 
^^IkLyra so 11 8 
l|p'Rigelso915 
Antaris so 8 49 
^ rises 11 25 

prises 3 17 



4 42 
4 43 
4 43 
4 44 



11 22 

12 14 
1 3 

1 50 

2 35 

3 19 

4 1 



29 
30 
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



29.) 


7th Sunday after Trinity. 




Mark 8. Day's length 


14 hours 30 minutes 




Sund 


18 Maternus 


5 48 


10 39 


^ 6 


D in apogee 


6,4 45 


7 15 


4 43 


6 


Mond 


19 Ruffina 


6 32 


11 9 


^ 17 


$ sets 9 31 


.6 


4 45 


7 15 


5 26 


7 


Tues 


20 Elija 


7 24 


11 41 


^29 


^D rises 9 33 

sjrAltairsll44 


6 


4 46 


7 14 


6 10 


8 


Wed 


21 Praxedes 


8 31 


morn 


mn 


6 


4 47 


7 13 


6 56 


9 


Thur 


22 Mary Mag. 


9 48 


12 17 


<#.24 


Fomal. so 2 49 


6 


4 48 


7 12 


7 45 


10 


Frid 


23 Apollinaris 


11 3 


12 57 


m 6 


^ stationary 


6 


4 49 


7 11 


8 35 


11 


Satur 124 Christiana 


morn 


1 42 


^19 


^ stationary n 


6 


4 49 


7 11 


9 29 


12 



30.) 8th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 7. 



Day's length 14 hours 20 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



25 St. James 

26 St. Ann 

27 Martha 

28 Pantaleon 

29 Beatrix 

30 Upton 

31 Germanus 



12 5 


2 35 


m 3 


12 56 


3 32 


m 17 


1 42 


rises 


^ 1 


2 32 


7 39 


^15 


3 5 


8 20 


3S 


3 44 


8 57 


i3515 


4 24 


9 33 


SS5 29 



$ great, elong. E. 
^ rises 10 58 
^TJl? sets 9 15 
^^2). rises 2 45 
]) in perigee 
Altairso 11 8 
1) rises 8 49 



10 25 

11 21 
morn 

12 18 

1 14 

2 9 

3 3 



i 



Has 31 Days. 



19 




MOON'S PHASES 

Last Quarter the 5th, at 3 o'clock, 42 minutes in the 
morning. 

New Moon the 12th, at 6 o'clock, 37 minutes in 
the morning. 

First Quarter the 20th, at 7 o'clock, 52 minutes in 
the morning, 

Full Moon the 27th, at 5 o'clock 7 min, afternoon- 

Conjecture of the Weather, 

The 1st, 2d showers; 3d, 4th, 5th clear; 6th, 
thunder and rain; 7th, 8th variable; 9th, clear; 
10th, 11th, 12th pleasant; 13th, 14th cloudy; 
15th rain; 16th, 17th, 18th changeable; 19th, 
20th pleasant; 21st, 22d cloudy, 23d, 24th 
clear; 25th rain; 26th, 27th pleasant; 28lh rain; 
29th, 30th clear; 31st. cloudy. 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 
Schuylkill 19 

A lady in town, scolded her black servant, the 
other day, for some very careless act, when the 
pious wench immediately ran into an adjoining 
room, and was overheard praying: • oh! Lord, 
raassa, come, come quick, and take me right out 
ob dis worl ; if you can't come yourself, sen de 
debbel, or somebody else.' 

An Old Maid's Uh of July Toast.— Onr 
Country: Like an old maid, may it ever boast of 
its freedom and independence, happy in its 
present state, yet ever looking forward, with 
pleasing anticipation to a change for the better, 
strictly guarding her virtues with a patriotic eye, 
and when Union is called for, ever ready to pre- 
sent her heart and hand. 

The Number Seven. 
The number Seven, in bygone days, was 
used on almost every occasion, in some way or 
another. Among the Jews, seven was considered 



a number of perfection. Indeed, the Scriptures, 
particularly the old Testament, abound with in- 
stances wherein a great number of events are set 
forth by the number seiren. Some of the most 
important occasions on which the number seven 
was used, I have selected : — 

After the creation, tie 7th day was conse- 
crated to rest; each we3k consisted of 7 days, 
(this number still makes the week;) the 7th year 
was directed to be a Sabbath for all things; every 
7th year the land lay fallow; every 7lh year the 
law was directed to be ead unto the people; Ja- 
cob served Laban 7 yesrs for his daughter; La- 
ban pursued Jacob 7 days journey; Noah had 7 
days warning of the food; and he was com- 
manded to take the fows and c/ean beasts into 
the ark by sevens; Phaoah dreamed of 7 fat and 
7 lean beasts, to whici succeeded 7 years of 
plenty, and 7 years of fem/ne; the blood was to 
be sprinkled 7 times or the alter; the house of 
wisdom, mentioned in Proverbs, had 7 pillars; 
Nebuchadnezzer's furrace was heated 7 times 
hotter than usual, for 3hadrach, Meshach and 
Abednego. The Jevvi^ law commands man to 
forgive his offending brrther 7 times, but Christi- 
anity commands him tc forgive the ofTences of 
his brother 70 times 7. Job's friends sat with 
him 7 days and 7 night; King Ahasuerus feast- 
ed 7 days; Solomon \vis 7 years building the 
temple, at the dedicatioi of which he feasted 7 
days; " Jesus of Nazarrth " spake 7 times from 
the cross, on which he emained 7 hours. Per- 
feotion is likened to god 7 times purified in the 
fire. In the old and Nevi Testaments are enumer- 
ated 7 resurrections, th* last of which was Jeais 
Christ. So far the Scriptures. 

In 7 months a chil(2 may be born, and not be- 
fore: in the 7th moiHh children's teeth appeal, 
and are shed and renewed in the 7th year. 

In 1776 the grfeat spirit of republicanism 
inspired the American people, and after a 
protracted war of 7 years, achieved the In- 
dependence of our beloved comtry, and it will 
remain 70 times 7 and forever, free and 
independent if the people be sober, industri- 
ous, virtuous, upright, honest and/ true, and, at 
the same time, " asking for noth^g that is not 
strictly right, and submitting to /nothing that 
is wrong." 



20 



The Eighth Month, or AUGUST— 1847, 



Week 
Days. 



Remarkable Dai^s. ^y^^^ 



Moon Moon's Aspects of Planets 8^ 



R.^S. Signs. 



other Miscellanies. 



Sun 



I Rises ^Sets. South. 



Moon -3 >, 



31.) 9th Sunday afted Trinity 



Luke 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 6 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



1 Lam. day 

2 Stephen 
Augustus 
Dominick 
Oswald 
A. of Christ 
Godfrey 



5 6 

5 33 

6 49 

8 2 

9 26 

10 45 

11 51 



10 11 

10 50 

11 31 
morn 

12 15 
1 3 
1 56 



ff«28 

^26 
5^ 9 
^23 

m 6 



$ sets 9 4 

cT rises 2 24 
2J. rises 2 24 

t) rises 8 29 vj 

Lyra so 9 30 



6 


4 57 


7 3 


3 56 


6 


4 57 


7 3 


4 49 


6 


4 58 


7 2 


5 43 


6 


4 59 


7 1 


6 36 


6 


5 1 


6 59 


7 30 


6 


5 2 


6 58 


8 24 


6 


5 3 


6 57 


9 17 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



lOth Sunday aftf Trinity. 



Luke 19. 



Day's length 13 hours 52 minutes. 



8 Emily 

9 Ericus 

10 St.Lavvre' 

11 Titus 



Clara 
Hildebert 



14 Eusebia 



12 42 

1 24 

2 

2 35 

3 5 

3 37 

4 7 



2 51 

3 48 
sets 
7 10 

7 42 

8 12 
8 41 



>■€ 19 
<e€14 

1!20 



^ great. H. L. S. 
Altair so 10 29 

^1^$ sets 8 40 
Ngpc^ rises 10 16 
2). rises 2 
t) rises 7 57 
^ in apogee c/ $ D 



5 10 



6 5Q 
6 55 
6 54 
6 53 
6 53 
6 52 
6 51 



10 827 
10 5828 



11 45 

12 31 
1 15 

1 58 

2 40 



29 

30 

31 

1 

2 



I Ifh Sunday afte 



Trinity. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 13 hours 38 minutes. 



15 Assn. V. 

16 Rochus 

17 Bertram 

18 Agapelus 

19 Sebaldus 

20 Bernard 

21 Rebecca 



4 40 

5 14 

5 54 

6 44 

7 45 
9 3 

10 27 



9 11 

9 42 

10 15 

10 53 

11 35 
morn 

12 23 



2S«i 14 
)^^ 2Q 

^27 



Antaris so 10 6 

Fomos so 1 11 

^ stationary 

$ sets 8 18 

^ rises 9 55 
Spi. sets 9 56 

t) rises 7 23 n 



11:6 49 


3 23 


13 6 48 


4 6 


146 46 


4 50 


15 6 45 


5 37 


16 6 44 


6 25 


176 43 


7 16 


186 42 


8 10 



12th Sunday afte 



Trinity. 



Mark 7. 



Day's length 13 hours 22 minutes. 



22 Philibert 

23 Zaccjieus 

24 St. Barthol 

25 Ludojvicus 
2Q Samijel 

27 Gebhkrd 

28 St.Ahgus'e 



11 40 
morn 

12 37 

1 24 

2 7 

2 48 

3 27 



1 17 

2 18 

3 23 

4 33 
rises 

7 30 

8 9 



^25 

^ 9 

^24 

^24 
ff« 9 



2J. rises 1 30 
Arcturusso 1111 
Alioth so 2 38 
^^^gr.elonW. 
^j/$ in aphelion 
3) in perigee 

^wi 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24^ 
26 
21 



6 41 
6 39 
6 38 
6 37 
6 36 
6 35 
6 33 



9 5 


10 


10 1 


11 


10 58 


12 


11 54 


13 


morn 


14 


12 50 


15 


1 46 


16 



13lh Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 10. 



Day's length 13 hours 4 minutes. 



29 Johiibehed, 

30 Benjamin 

31 Paulina 



4 7 


8 48|^ 22| 


4 50 


9 29 


^ 8 


5 37 


10 14 


^22 



$ sets 7 45 
^ rises 9 22 
^ in perihelion 



28 
29 
30 



2 41117 



3 36 

4 31 



Has 31 Days. 



21 




twenty-three years, the people have been in a 
state of civil warfare, contention aud ruin — and 
then let us ask, " Who wonld not be an Ameri- 
can citizen?" 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter the 3d, at 8 o'clock, 59 min. in the 
morning , 

New moon the 10th, at 7 o'clock, 28 minutes in the 
afternoon. 

First Quarter the 19th, at 12 o'clock, 1 minute in 
the morning'. 

Full Moon the 25th, at 1 o'clock, 9 minutes in the 
morning'. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

. The 1st rain; 2d, 3d, 4th very warm; 5th rain' 
6th, 7th, 8th, dry and warm; 9th, 10th, 11th 
variable, want of rain; 12th, clear; 13th rain: 
14th, 15th pleasant: 16th, 17lh cloudy: 18th, 
19th clear: 20th rain: 21st, 22d, 23d clear; 24th 
rain: 25lh, 26th, 27th, 28th variable: 29ih clear: 
30th, 31st cloudy. 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 

Clarion .... I 3 
Berks, Chesterj Erie, Lebanon, Luzerne, Mif- 
flin, Northumberland, Ferry, York - 4 
Crawford, Cumberland, Franklin, Huntingdon 11 

Columbia, Dauphin, Lancaste;r, Montgomery, 

Northampton, Washington, Westmoreland - 18 

Adams, Bedford, Centre, Delaware, - 25 

Pike - - - - - 26 



Think of it. — Americans are sometimes 
prone to fault-find about their own condition. 
Let them reflect that in France laborers do not 
average 12 cents per day for their toil. In 
England, thousands on thousands labor in the 
coal mines, and never see the light of day — men, 
women and children ! In some of the British 
Provinces, thousands on thousands are kept in 
abject dependence, the sport and pray of trading 
monopolies ; and that nearer home, in Peru, for 



Take the, other hand. — It was one of the first 
s of Spring, when a lady who had b&en 
watching by the sick-bed of her mother,for some 
weeks, went out to take a little exercise and en- 
joy the fresh air. She hoped that she might hear 
a bird sing, or see some little wild flower which 
would speak to her of her future hopes, for her 
heart was full of anxiety and sorrow. After 
walking some distance she came to a ropewalk. 
She was familiar with the place and entered. At 
one end of the building, she saw a little boy 
turning a large wheel ; she thought it too labori- 
ous for such a child, and as she came near, she 
spoke to him. " Who sent you to this place?" 
she asked " Nobody; I came of myself." hoes 
your father know that you are here!" " I have 
no father.' 'Are you paid for your labour V 'Yes;' 
and I get ninepence a day." " What do you do 
with your money 1" " I give it all to my mo- 
ther." " Do you like this work?" " Well 
enough ; but if I did not, I should do it that I 
might get the money for my mother." " How 
long do you work in the day?" " From nine till 
eleven in the morning, and from two till five in 
the afternoon." " How old are you?" " Almost 
nine." " Do you never get tired of turning this 
great wheel?" "Yes; sometimes." "And what do 
you do then?' ' I take the other hand.' The lady 
gave him a piece of money. ♦ Is this for mother?' 
he asked, looking pleased. 'No, it's for yourself.* 

^ Pensioner. — " You ought to have a pen- 
sion," said a wag to an unfortunate who was in 
the habit of taking a drop too much. " How so?" 
inquired red eye. " Why, you fell at the battle* 
of Brandy fVine.^^ 

W^^ *' Does Mr. Hobson keep Lent ?" « Most 
certainly; whatever is lent to him, he is sure 
to keep.^^ 

• Annexatiow AND War? ' cxclaimed a pert old 
maid with a shrill voice; ' that's tnie, every'word of it, 
for no sooner do you get maried than you begin to 

FIGHT?' 



22 



The Ninth Month, or SEPTEMBER--1847, 



Week 




High 


Moon 


Moon's 


Aspects of Planets Sf 


^■^ 


Sun 


Moon 


Tiel 


Days. 




Water. 


R.S^S. 


Signs. 


other Miscellanies. 


^S 


Rises ^Sets. 


South. 


5^ 


Wed 


1 Egedius 


6 32 


11 2 


^ 6 


/^$ sets 7 30 


^ 


5 32 


6 28 


5 26 


20 


Thur 


2 Eliza 


7 38 


11 53 


^20 


^J^D O vj 


CO 


5 33 


6 27 


6 20 


21 


Frid 


3 Mansuetus 


8 5Q 


morn 


>^ 3 


c? rises 9 9 


1 


5 34 


6 26 


7 13 


22 


Satur 


4 Moses 


10 28 


12 47 


^16 


c/Zj-D 


1 


5 36 


6 24 


8 5 


23 



36.) 14th^Sunday after Trinity, 
S^d 



Luke 17. 



Day's length 12 hours 46 minutes. 



Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



5 Nathaniel 

6 Magnus 

7 Regina 

8 Nat. V. M. 

9 Bruno 

10 Pulcheria 

11 Protus 



11 28 


1 44 


»^28 


12 19 


2 41 


•firii 


12 59 


3 37 


'ff S3 


1 36 


4 35 


^ 5 


2 9 


sets 


^117 


2 39 


6 43 


^29 


3 9 


7 14 


2^11 



2|. rises 12 40 
i) south 114 
Lyra so 8 31 
$ sets 7 1 

Alt. so 8 37 
$ stationary 
3) in perigee 



15 37 


6 23 


8 55 


2 5 38 


6 22 


9 43 


25 39 


6 21 


10 29 


25 41 


6 19 


11 13 


35 42 


6 18 


11 56 


3;5 43 


6 17 


12 37 


3 5 44 


6 16 


1 21 



24 
25 
26 
21 

28 
29 
30 



37.) 


1 5th Sunday after 


Trinity. 




Matt. 6 


Day's length 


12 hours 28 minutes 


. 


Sund 


12 J. Wickliffe 


3 40 


7 44 


Js'JB ^'^ 


cf ris-es 8 39 


4 


5 46 


6 14 


2 331 


Mond 


13 Amatus 


4 12 


8 17 


m 4 


2j. rises 12 20 


4 


5 47 


6 13 


2 47 


I 


Tues 


14 El. H.Cross 


4 47 


8 52 


<#il6 


t) so 11 10 


4 


5 48 


6 12 


3 32 


2 


'Wed 


15 EiTQber day 


5 26 


9 31 


m28 


Fomal. so 11 9 


5 


5 50 


6 10 


4 19 


3 


Thur 


16 Nicetas 


6 12 


10 15 


S^lOcT south 11 13 


5 


5 51 


6 9 


5 8 


4 


Frid 


17 Lazarus 


7 8 


11 6 


m22 


^?gr.H.L.S. 
s^Spicas82n 


5 


5 52 


6 8 


5 59 


5 


Satur 


18 Siegifred 


8 25 


morn 


m 6 


6 


5 54 


6 6 


6 52 


6 



38.) 


16th Sunday after Trinity. 




Luke 


7. Day's length 


12 hours 10 minutes 


. 


Sund 


19 Micleta 


9 52 


12 1 


^19 


^ in sup. c/ 


6 


5 55 


6 5 


7 46 


7 


Mond 


20 Jonas 


11 9 


1 2 


^ 3 


$ sets 6 4 


7 


5 56 


6 4 


8 41 


8 


Tues 


21 St. Matthew 


morn 


2 8 


^17 


cT rises 8 6 


7 


5 57 


6- 3 


9 37 


9 


Wed 


22 Maurice 


12 13 


3 19 




prises 11 48 


7 


5 59 


6 1 


10 33 


10 


Thur 


23 Josea 


1 3 


4 29 


3S17 


cfh 2), Sun en. Li. 


8 


6 


6 


11 28 


11 


Frid 


24 St. John CO. 


1 47 


rises 


fP* 2 


^Thl) in perigee 


8 


6 1 


5 59 


morn 


12 


Satur 


25 Cleopas 


2 30 


6 41 


^17 


^^Lyraso613 


8 


6 3|5 57 


12 25 


13 



39.) 


7th Sunday after Trinity. 


Luke 14. Day's length 11 hours 52 minutes 




Sund 


26 Justin 


3 10 


7 22;^, 2 


t) so 10 20 


96 4 


5 56 


1 22 


14 


Mond 


27 Cosmus 


3 51 


8 9^17 


c/^$, c/<?3) 


96 5 


5 55 


2 19 


15 


Tues 


28 Winceslaus 


4 35 


8 56.5^ 2 


^ rises 7 37 


96 7 


5 53 


3 16 


16 


Wed 


29 St. Michael 


5 20 


9 47|^ 16 


$ sets 5 18 


106 8 


5 52 


4 12 


17 


Thur 


30 Jerome 


6 11 


10 4.^^ 29 


Fom. so 10 10^ 


10,6 9 


5 51 


5 7 


18 



Has 30 Days. 



23 




MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter the 1st, at 4 o'clock, 13 minutes in 
the afternoon. 

New Moon the 9th, at 10 o'clock, 46 minutes in 
the morning*. 

First Quarter the 17th, at 2 o'clock, 20 minutes in 
afternoon. 

Full Moon the 24th, at 9 o'clock, 25 minutes in the 
the morning. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

. The 1st, 2d pleasant ; 3d, 4th cloudy; 5th 
warm and sultry; 6th thunder; 7th, 8ih, 9ih 
cloudy, rainy;' 10th clear; 11th, 12th, 13th 
pleasant; 14th, 15th cloudy; 16th, 17th rainy; 
18th, 19th pleasant ; 20th, 21st, 22d change- 
able; 23d, 24th cloudy, rainy; 25th, 26th clear; 
27th, 28lh cloudy; 29lh, 30lh clear. 

Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Cemmon Pleas. 
Reaver, Fayette, Susquehanna, Warren, Wayne 6 
Hradford, Bucks, Butler, Jefferson - 13 

Union, Armstrong, Green, M'Kean, Monroe, 

Philadelphia . - - - 20 

Indiana, Potter - - - - 27 




AGTtlCU LTURAL. 

THINGS A FARMER SHOULD|NOT DO. 
' A farmer should never undertake to cultivate 
more land than he can do thoroughly; half tilled 
land will become poorer, until good for nothing 
except to starve on ; well tilled land is constant- 
ly improving, and will pay ten fold by good 
manuring. 

A farmer should never keep more cattle. 



horses, sheep or hogs, than he can keep in good 
order ; an animal in high order the first of De-r 

; cember, is already half wintered. 

A farmer never should depend on his neigh- 
bour for what he can by care and good manage- 
ment produce on his own farm; he should never 
borrow tools while he can make or buy ; a high 
authority has said, the borrower is^ servant to 
the lender. 

A farmer should never be so immersed in po- 
litical matters, as to forget to sow his wheat, dig 
his potatoes, and bank up his sellar; n r should 
he be so inattentive to them as to remain igno- 
rant of those great questions of national and state 
policy which will always agitate, more or less, 
a free people. 

No farmer should allow the reproach of neg- 
lecting education to lie against himself and family; 
all should be early taught the common rudiments 
of education; which is extremely necessary, es- 

\ pecially in a republic like ours. 

TO THE FARMER. 

\ It will be of interest to American farmers io 
\ learn, from a letter dated Liverpool, Oct. 2, (in 
I Bicknell's Reporter) that much American butter 
j has been sold (or 5 and 6 cents in England, which 
'( might have brought three times that amount but 
; for the bad management in putting it up. 
\ " The consumption of butter in London alone 
5 is estimated at 20,000 tons annually, of which 
J nearly one-half is imported from Holldud and 
\ Germany, paying nearly 5 cents perpound duty. 
\ That foreigners are able to pay this duty, and 
\ drive the English and Irish farmers from their 
\ own markets, is the result entirely of superior 
\ management in manufacture. This same ad- 
\ vantage might be pursued by the farmers of the 
\ United States. 

< " Annatto is used to give a good rich yellew 
\ colour to the butler. // is cured best for keep- 
ing by a mixture of fine loaf sugar and salt 
powdered in the proportion of 4 ounces of the 
former to half a pound of the latter, and used in 
the proportion of an ounce to a pound of butter.. 

To preserve Eggs.—Egge, it is said, may 
\ be preserved good for a year, if kept in lime 
] water salted. 



24 



The Tenth Month, or OCTOBER— 1847, 



If^^^ I Remarkable Days. 
Days. I -^ 



High I Moon Moon's Aspects of Planets ^ ^i 



Water.lR.SfS. Signs 



other Miscellanies^ 



Sun 



fe Rises S^ Sets. 



Moon \^ ^ 
South, p^ 



Frid 
Satur 



1 Remigius 

2 Ch.Columb. 



7 10 

8 25 



11 39 

morn 



^ 13 

m25 



^ rises 7 24 
Spica so 7 7 



6 11 
5 12 



5 49 

5 48 



19 
20 



40.) 18th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt, 22. 



Day's length 11 hours 34 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



Jairus 

Franciscus 

Placidus 

Fides 

Amelia 

8 Pelagius 

9 St. Deny's 



9 42 


12 35 


<f? 8 


10 50 


1 33 


^20 


11 46 


2 29 


^ 2 


12 31 


3 26 


^ 14 


1 7 


4 20 


^26 


1 40 


5 15 


^^5 ^ 


2 13 


sets 


S% 19 



jininf.c/O 
2J. rises 1111 
2 rises 6 1 
t, so 9 38 
Algen. so 10 58 
iillv D in perigee 



11 


6 13 


5 47 


7 40 


11 


6 14 


5 46 


8 27 


11 


6 16 


5 44 


9 11 


12 


6 17 


5 43 


9 55 


12 


6 18 


5 42 


.10 37 


12 


6 20 


5 40 


11 19 


13 


6 21 


5 39 


12 2 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



41.) 


19th Sunday after Trinity. 




Matt. 


9. Day's length 


11 hours 16 


minutes 


. 


Sund 


10 Gereon 


2 45 


6 18 


m 1 


c/^2) 


13 


6 22 


5 38 


12 46 


28 


Mond 


11 Burkhard 


3 17 


6 53 


«13 


$ rises 5 20 


13 


6 24 


5 36 


1 30 


29 


Tues 


12 Veritas 


3 41 


7 31 


«ii25 


c^ rises 6 33 


13 


6 25 


5 35 


2 17 


30 


Wed 


13 Colomon 


4 25 


8 13 


<f$ ''' 


4-n O 


14 


6 26 


5 34 


3 5 


1 


Thur 


14 Fortunata 


5 4 


9 


m2o 


2|. rises 10 33 r\ 


14 


6 21 


5 33 


3 54 


2 


Frid 


15 Hedwick 


5 50 


9 52 


m 2 


t> south 9 01 


14 


6 29 


5 31 


4 45 


3 


Satur 


16 Gallus 


6 44 


10 50 


mi5 


Algen. so 10 23 


14 


6 30 


5 30 


5 37 


4 



42.) 


20th Sunday after Trinity. 




Matt. 22. Day's length 


10 hours 58 minutes 


. - 


Sund 


17 Florentine 


7 53 


11 52 


^28 


'^Orion r. 9 34 
^2|.ini^ 


15 


6 31 


5 29 


6 30 


5 


Mond 


18 St. Luke Ev 


9 14 


morn 


^1^ 


15 


6 33 


5 27 


7 23 


6 


Tues 


19 Ptolemy 


10 37 


12 57 


^.26 


$ rises 4 31 


15 


6 34 


5 26 


8 17 


7 


Wed 


20 Felicianus 


11 45 


2 5 


as 10 


$ rises 5 54 


15 


6 35 


5 25 


9 11 


8 


Thur 


21 Ursula 


morn 


3 18 


3£25 


$ stationary 


15 


6 36 


5 24 


10 6 


9 


Frid 


22 Cordula 


12 42 


4 28 


^10 


^:$|Ant. s 11 52 


15 


6 38 


5 22 


11 2 


10 


Satur 


23 Severinus 


1 28 


rises 


•^25 


^£^^ in perigee 


16 


6 39 


5 21 


morn 


11 



43.) 21st Sunday after Trinity. 



John 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 40 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



24 Salome 

25 Crispin 

26 Amandus 

27 Sabina' 

28 Simon Jude 

29 Zuinglius 

30 Serapion 



2 12 


5 55 


^10 


2 51 


6 44 


m25 


3 35 


7 35 


^10 


4 17 


8 30 


-^24 


5 02 


9 27 


\^ 8 


5 52 


10 25 


^2\ 


6 42 


11 23 


^ 4 



Sirius rises 11 18 
2|. rises 9 53 
$ rises. 3 57 
^ rises 5 18 
t) so8 8 

cPcTO 



16,6 40 
166 41 
16 6 42 
166 44 
166 45 



20 
19 
18 
16 
15 



166 46!5 14 

166 47I5 13 



12 
12 58 

1 57 

2 55 

3 51 

4 45 

5 35 



44.) 22d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 22 minutes. 



Sund 131 Wolfgang | 7 43|morn|<^ 17|7*'s so 12 |16|6 49|5 11| 6 24|19 



Has 31 Days. 



35 




MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter the 1st, at 2 o'clock 32 min. in the mor. 
New Moon the 9th, at 4 o'clock^ 6 min. in the mor. 
First Quarter the i7th, at 2 o'clyck, 40 min. mor.. 
Full Moon the 23fl, at 6 o'clock, 35 min. in the aft'n. 
Last Quarter the 30th at 4 o'clock, 55 min. in.the afi'n. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 
The 1st, 2d, 3d clear.- 4th rain; 5th, 6th, 
7th variable; 8th, 9th clear.- 10th, 11th, 12th 
changeable; 13th, 14th clear ; 15th, 16th 17th 
changeable ; 18th rain ; 19th clear 20th, 
21st, 22d stormy; 23d, 24th clear ; 25th, 26th 
rainy; 27lh clear ; 28th, 29th, 30lh changea- 
ble ; 31st clear. 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 
Cambria ---.--. 5 

Mercer, Schuylkill, Tioga .... 18 

Alleghany, Venango .... 25 



Wintering Sheep. — There is one subject 
which has as yet received but little attention from 
our farmers— it is that of providing suitable sheds 
for the protection of sheep from the winter cold. 
Now we are aware that many farmers consider 
this as wholly unnecessary, and believe that 
sheep, with their thick coats of wool, would be 
no more benefitted by shelter, than the down- 
clad animals of the Arctic regions. But this is 
a great error. Who has not observed them, on 
the approach of severe weather, carefully seek- 
ing what feeble protection they could obtain 
from the storm by the side of stacks, or under 
open fences 1 Would they do this if it did not 
contribute to their comfort. Certainly not. in 
those countries in Europe which grow large 
quantities of the finest wool, strict attention is 
given to this subject, and sheep are not only 
sheltered every night, but whenever weather de- 
mands it during the day; and this is also said to 



be essentially necessaryin preserving the quality 
and fineness of the wool. _ 

Feeding of Poultry. ...Prokssor Gregory, of 
Aberdeen, in a letter to a friend, observes — ' As 
I suppose you keep poultry, I may tell yon that 
it has been ascertained that if you mix with their 
food a sufficient quantity of egg-shells r r chalk, 
which they eat greedily, they will lay. twice or 
thrice as many eggs as before. A well-fed fowl 
is disposed to lay a vast number of eggs, but can- 
not do so without the materjuls for the shells, 
however nourishing in other respects her food 
may be; indeed a fowl fed on food and water, 
free from carbonate of lime, and not finding any 
in the soil, or in the shape of mortar, which they 
often eat off the walls, would lay no eggs at all 
with the best will in the world. 



Dairy Secret. — Have ready two pans in 
boiling water ; and on the new milk's coming to 
the dairy, take the hot pans out of the water, put 
the milk into one of them, and cover it with the 
other. This will occasion great augmentation 
in the thickness of the cream. 



Cure/or a Burn.— Scrape the inside of a po- 
tatoe ; mix sweet-oil and turpentine, one spoon 
full of each, so as to make a poultice of the mix- 
ture, apply it to the burn immediately, and it 
will extract the heat, and if the burn be very large, 
and in great danger of increased inflamation, 
change the poultice every half-hour. 

Plants in rot/;s.— Experienced agriculturists 
state that plants, whether in garden, field or for- 
est, if in rows, should be placed in the direction 
of north and south, in order to admit the sun*« 
rays, on both sides of the row. 

To preserve Young Young Trees in Nur- 
series ^ SfC, from Rabbits, Mice, and Moles. — 
Take any quantity of tar, and six or seven times 
as much grease, stirring and mixing them well 
together ; with this composition brush the stems 
of young trees as high as rabbits &c. can reachj 
and it will prevent their being barked. 



96 



The Eleventh Month, or NOVEMBER— 1847, 



Week 


Remarkable Days. 


Hiffh 


.Moon 


Moon's 


Aspects of Planets 4* 


^^ 


Sun 


ilfoon 


■"V 


Days. 


Water. 


R.SfS. 


Signs. 


ofAcr Miscellanies . 


S- 


Rises ^Sets. 


South. 


o6 


Monjd 


1 All Saints 


8 5l 


12 21 


<f^29 


$ rises 3 35 


16 


6 50 


5 10 


7 9,20 


TU€S 


2 All Souls 


10 3 


1 18 


^.111 


^ so 11 30 


16 


6 51 


5 9 


7 5321 


Wed 


3 Theophilus 


11 1 


2 14 


^23 


1}. rises 9 18 


16 


6 52 


5 8 


8 35,22 


Thur 


4 Charlotte 


11 53 


3 11 


j^ 5 


^ in perigee 


16 


6 53 


5 7 


9 1823 


Frid 


5 Malachias 


12 36 


4 6 


^ 16 


^ gr. elong. E. 


16 


6 54 


5 6 


10 024 


Satur 


6 Leonard 


1 12 


5 -1 


2^28 


t) so 7 32 


16 


6 55 


5 5 


10 4325 



45.) 23d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 22. 



Day's length 10 hours 6 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



7 Englebert 

8 Cecelia 

9 Theodore 
rO Mart. Luth. 

11 P. Melanc'n 

12 Jonas 

13 Winebert 



1 47 

2 22 

2 56 

3 22 

4 8 

4 48 

5 : 



5 37 

sets 

6 12 

6 57 

7 48 

8 44 

9 43 



<^10 
^22 
m 4 
^17 

^12 

m25 



0ml\- stationary 
1^11$ at gr. bril. 
Ariet. so 10 41 
t) stationary 
2 rises 3 16 n 
c? so 10 39 
Sirius so 10 3 



167 
167 
16,7 



6 57 

6 58 

6 59 

7 

1 



3 
2 

1 



59 

58 
57 



11 2826. 

12 1427 
1 228 

1 5129 

2 42 30 

3 34 31 

4 26] 1 



46.) 24th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 9. Day's length 9 hours 52 minutes. 


Sund 


14 Levinus 


6 33 


10 45 


^ 8iL rises 8 33 


15 


7 4 


4 56 


5 17 


2 


Mond 


15 Leopold 


7 23 


11 51 


^22 


^'gl^ stationary 
vJP't) so 6 53 


15 


7 5 


4 55 


6 9 


3 


Tues 


16 Ottomar 


8 37 


morn 


3*; 6 


15 


7 6 


4 54 


7 1 


4 


Wed 


17 Alpheus 


10 3 


12 59 


35? 20 


^ south 10 14 


15 


7 7 


4 53 


7 53 


5 


Thur 


18 Gelasius 


11 18 


2 7 


^ 4 


7*'s so 11 45 - 


15 


7 8 


4 52 


8 47 


61 


Frid 


19 Elizabeth 


morn 


3 16 


ff«19 


^i^Sl 


14 


7 9 


4 51 


9 421 7 


Satur 


20 Amos 


12 18 


4 27 


^4 


I) in perigee 


14 


7 10 


4 50110 39i 8 



47.) 25th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 24. 



Day's length 9 hours 38 minutes. 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



21 Off. V. M. 

22 Alphonsus 

23 Clement 

24 Chrisogenes 

25 Catharine 

26 Conrad 

27 Jo^o^hat 



1 8 

1 54 

2 38 

3 20 

4 1 

4 42 

5 32 



5 39 
rises 

6 13 
7 

8 10 

9 10 
10 10 



^19 
3 

^18 

■ 2 

W^16 

<m 



io»^ 



$ riseg 3 9 

■>4. rises 8 2 
Al.so7 54^ 

c^ so 9 42 

t) south 6 14 



<^ 12^ perihelion 



127 



11,4 

124 
124 
134 
144 
15:4 
164 



11 


371 


morn 


12 


36 


1 


34 


2 


31 


■3 25| 


4 


161 



48.) 1st Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 21, 



Day's length 9 hours 28 minutes. 



Sund 
Mond 
Tues 



28 Guntherus 

29 Saturn 

|30 St. Andrew 



711 9 
57 morn 
56,12 6 



<m25 

^ 7 
^19 



$ rises 3 9 



7 16j4 44 

7 1714 43 
7 18'4 42 



5 4 

5 49 

6 32 



HasSODrtys. 



27 




MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon the 7th. at 10 o'clock, JOmin. in the afl'n. 
First Quarter the 15ih, at 1 o'clock, 14 min. after'n. 
Full Moon the 2Jcl, at 5 o'clock, 4 min. nwrning. 
JLast Quarter the 29th, at 1 1 o'clock, 21 min. morning. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 

The 1st, 2d variable : 3d, 4th cloudy, with 
rain; 5th, 6th, 7ih pleasant; 8th, 9ih cloudy; 
10th, 11th, 12ih pleasant; 13th, 14ih variable j* 
15ih, 16ih clear; 17th, 18ih, 19th, 20th cloudy; 
21st, 22d clear; 23d, 24th, 25ih changeable; 
26th, 27th clear : 28th, 29ih, 30th cloudy, 
rainy. 



to them. Sh'e therefore, locked the children in- 
to the room, |n'd snatched her bed-clothes, lest 
they should lieep the contagion behind her, and 
left the house. She even denied herself the sad, 
pleasure of a last embrace. O think of the heroism > 
that enabled her to conquer her feelings, and 
leave home and all she loved— to die. Her old' 
est child saw her from the window. "Good-bye, 
mother," said he, with the tenderest tone, for he 
wondered why his mother left them so strange- 
ly. " Good bye, mother," repeated the young- 
est child, stretching his littk hand out of the 
window. The mother paused. Her heart was 
drawn towards her children, and she was on the 
point of rushing back. She struggled l\ard while ' 
the tears rolled down her cheeks, at the sight of 
her helpless babes. At length she turned from 
them. The children continued to cry, " Good- 
bye mother." The sounds sent a thrill of anguish 
to her heart, but she passed on to the house of 
those who were to bury her. In two days she 
died,recommeiiding her husband and children to 
their care with her dying b^"""*^ 



Court of Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 

Berks, Chester, Erie, Lebanon, Luzerne, Mifflin, 

Nortl.umberland, Perry, Yoik - . - 1 

Clarion - - 3 

Crawfoid, Cumberland; Franlslin, Huntingdon, 

Washington 8 

Columbia, Dauphin, Lancaster, Montgomery, North. 

ampton, Susquehanna, Wayne, Westmor«land 15 

Adams, Bedford Centre. Delaware, - - 22 

Pike - - " 23 

Beaver^ Clearfield, Lehigh, Lycoming, Somerset 29 



Ji Mother's Dying Love.— The plague broke 
out in a little Italian village. In one house the 
children^were taken first. The whole family 
fled. 0n the opposite side of the way, livfed the 
family of a poor laborer, who was absent the 
\\\\o\e week, only coming home Satur«!ay 
night to bring his scanty earnings. His^wife 
fell herself attacked by the fever in the niglit. In 
the morning she was much worse, and before 
night the plague spot showed itself. She thought 
of the terrible fate of her neighbors. She knew 
she must die, but, as she looked upon hei* dear 
little boys, she resolved fiot to commuicate death 



28 



The Twelfth Month, or DECEMBER— 1847, 



Week 
Days. 



Wed 
Thur 
Frid 
Satur 



Remarkable Days. ^^|^^ 



1 Longinus 

2 Candidus 

3 Cassianus 

4 Barbara 



Moon 
R.SfS. 



9 1 

10 9 

11 8 
11 58 



1 1 

1 57 

2 53 

3 48 



Moon's Aspects of Planets Sf «i 



^^ 13 
^ 25 
^ 6 



other Miscellanies. 



Sun 



fa Rises Sf Sets. 



$ rises 3 10 
I) n apogee 
^ stationary 
^ south 11 20 



7 18 
7 19 

7 20 
7 20 



42 
41 
40 
40 



Moon 
South. 



7 15 

7 57 

8 40 

9 23 



19 
20 
21 

22 



49.) 



Sund 

Mond 

Tues 

Wed 

Thur 

Frid 

Satur 



2 d Sunday in Advent. 

12 43 



Luke 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 18 minutes. 



5 Abigail 

6 Nicholas 

7 Agathon 

8 Co. V.Mary 

9 Joachim 

10 Judith 

11 Barsabas 



1 24 

2 3 

2 39 

3 17 

3 55 

4 34 



4 45 

5 41 

sets 

5 42 

6 38 

7 36 

8 39 



«i6l9 
<^ 1 
^13 

^ 9 

m2 

^ 5 



^ stationary 
Aldeb. so 11 23 
0h^ gr.H.L.N 

^^llz). ris. 8 59 n 
t) south 7 20 
Arie. so. 10 37 
$ rises 3 17 



9 


7 21 


9 


7 21 


8 


7 22 


8 


7 22 


7 


7 23 


7 


7 23 


7 


7 23 



4 39, 
4 39 

4 38 
4 38' 

4 37| 
4 37 
4 371 



10 923 

10 5724 

11 4625 

12 3826 

1 3027 

2 2228 

3 1529 



50.) 
Sund 
Mond 
Tues 



3d Sunday in Advent. 



*Matt. 11/ 



Day's length 9 hours 12 minutes. 



12 Otilia 

13 Lucy 

14 Was'n. died 



5 15 

6 1 
6 57 

8 8 



9 42^19^80 10 39 



10 49 

11 a 



Sl6 

^ 



Capella so 11 34 
~ $ gr. El. W. 
2\. rises 8 30 
^ perihelion 
Rigelso 11 20 
D in perigee 



24 
24 
24 
25 



4 36 
4 36 
4 36 
4 35 
2514 35 
254 35 
254 35 



4 7 

4 58 

5 49 

6 40 

7 32 

8 26 

9 22 



Day's length 9 hours 10 minutes. 



t) SO 6 41 

$ rises 3 27 

^^cT so 9 58 
7*'s so 9 28 
2|. rises 7 54 
Aide, so 10 8 



3 7 25 
21 25 
2 7 25 
17 25 
1,7 25 
£-7 25 
§i7 25 



4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 



10 19 

11 17 
morn 

12 15 

1 10 

2 4 
2 54 



J? so 9 33 
D so 6 11 
$ rises 3 38 

CD in apogee 
in perigee' 3 
Orion so. 11 8 3 



Day's length 9 hours 10 minutes. 

35 



7 25 
7 25 
7 25 
7 24 
7 24 
7 24 



4 36 
4 36 
4 36 



3 42114 
4'27|l5 
5 10,16 

5 53:17 

6 3518 

7 1819 



Has 31 Days. 



:29 




New 
First 
Full 
Last 



MOON'S FHA-SES. 



Quarter the 14th^ at 10 o'clock j 25 min. after'W. 
Moon the 21st, at 5 o'clock, 7 min. in the aft'n. 
Quarter the 29th, at 8 o'clock 47 min. mor. 

Conjecture of the Weather. 



of all kinds — a habit of living within one's in- 
come, and saving something for extraordinary- 
occasions — an ability arising from rational econo- 
my to defray all necessary and expedient ex- 
penses — a habit of good humour, and aptitude 
to be pleased rather than offended — a prepara- 
tion for adversity—love of one's family — sincer- 
ity to'4riends — ^evolence to mankind — and 
real piety to God^ 



The 1st, 2d, 3d, pleasant. 4th, 5th, 6th Tth 
variable. 8th, 9th, lOih clear. 11th snow. 12th 
clear. 13th, 14th, 15th cold. 16th, 17th cloudy. 
18th clear. 19th, 20th stormy. 21st, 22d, 23d 
rain. 24th 25th, 26th, 27th mostly clear, 28ih 
29th, 30th variable. 31st rain. 



Supreme Cowr^— Philadelphia 20. 
Court K)f Quarter Sessions & Court of Common Pleas. 

Fayette^ Juniata, Philadelphia ... 5 
Armstrong-, Bradford, Bucks, Butler, Jefferson^, 

Union_, Monroe - - - - - -1,1 

Greene^ M'Keen, Schuylkill - - - - 20 

Alleghany^ Indiana^ Mercerv Potter, Warren 27 



" Friend Franklin,^' said Myers Fisher, a 
celebrated Quaker lawyer of Philadelphia, one 
day, " thee knows almost every thing; can thee 
tell me how I am to preserve my small beer in 
the back yard ? my neighbours are tapping it of 
nights." 

" Put a barrel of old Madeira by the side of it," 
replied the Doctor; " let them but get a taste of 
the Madeira, and I will engage they will never 
trouble thy small beer any more. 

Solid Comfort may be copiously derived 
from the following sources : a quiet concience — 
health-liberty-one's time is one's own; or if not, 
usefully, innocently and moderately employed 
by others—a freedom from inordinate passions 




-Dr. Benjamin Franklin. 

Marks of Wisdom. — Dr. Franklin used to 
say, «that he could distinguish a wise man from 
a fool, by the following marks : Moderation in 
anger, government in household affairs, and 
writing a letter without useless repetitions.' 

The following copy of a letter, written by 
the Doctor, is expressive of his determination, 
to make no useless repetitions. 

Philad. July 5, 1775. 
Mr. Strahan, 

You are a Member of Parliament, and one 
of that Majority which has doomed my Country 
to Distraction — You have begun to burn our 
Towns and murder our People. — Look upon 
your Hands! — They are stained with the 
Blood of your Relations! — You and I tvere 
png Friends: — You are now my Enemy, — and 

J am, 

Yours, 

B. Franklin. 



3f 



Brother Jonathan's Almanac, 




SPANISH BULL FIGHTS. 



ingh buU fights were formally abolished 
'by Gliarles /F., yet they are still retained in 
raajiy parts of Spain. A British officer, who 
served in the war of the Peninsula, thus des- 
cribes a bull %ht, which he witnessed in the 
square of Truxillo. 

A few minutes after seven o'clock in the even- 
ing, the Spaniards, who were to fight the bulls, 
appeared in the squar|j,c each provided with a 
brown cloak in the 1# hand, and a pike in the 
right. These having t^ken their posts, one o/ 
the bulls was turned out, who, «n making his 
debut, looked furiously wild, while the air rung 
with the acclamations of a delighted populace. 
The honest bull had no idea that 8«ch a reception , \ 
•■■ awaited-him, as, in all hij^rmer perambulations, 
no one had deigned to ^ice hiiii He gazed 
on the passing scene with wonder, Irl a few 
minutes he became quite fuipious. Perceiving an 
opening under onfe of the waggons at the lower 
part of the s^tiare, he darted towards it, in hopes 
of -obt^ning his liberty. The Waggon was 
crOAyded with men and women, who, at the ani- 
mal's lip pro ach, were precipitated in curious 
ari^ truly laughable attitudes, from their exalted 
siation to the same level, with the object of their 
fears. For a time, every eye was turned to the 
^•^cene of confusion, anxiously waiting the result 
':^onhe grand charge of the courageous animal. 



Afthis momentous crisis, so big with th^yS^ 
many, the Spanish heroes advancecj to me^t^eir 
antagonist, and with savage bellowing, stopped 
bim short in his victoyous career. To one of 
his tormentors he turned' with death-like fuyy, 
ani on his head seemed determined to wreak hi^ 
iMppst vefigeance. The object of his hatred he 
pursued with such speed, that every one thought 
Ihelife of the Spaniard would be forfeited to his 
temerity. But well the wily Don knew that the 
bull could be deceived: and, to show us that 
such was the fact; he permitted the mad animal 
to get so close, as to make an attempt to toss 
him on his horns. Thus situated, the Spaniard 
had recourse to his cloak^; which he threw at the 
head of the-btdl; who fancying the man in his 
power, stopped-,' and tossed it in the air. The 
other four were not idle during this rencontre be- 
tween their fqiend and the bull. Having come 
to his assistance, one of them inflicted a wound 
in the hip of the poor brute, and made the best 
of his way to a place of safety i holly pursued by 
his enemy, till stopped by the cloak of the fugi- 
tive, and the pikes of the others, as berefore. In 
this. manner thefight cpntinued, till the creature 
was completely exhausted, unable to shake his 
head, or raise his foot. In this state he was re- 
movedi to make room for a second, who affoded 
no sport whatever. 






mmssm. 



BATTLE OF RESACA DE LA PALMA. 



On the 9th of May,. about one, p. M.,the army 
resumed its march. " Wfien it first halted, Cap- 
lain G. A. M'Call had been sent ahead with 100 
picked men to scour the chaparral and watch the 
progress of the enemy. Captain Smith, of the 
Artillery, with his battalion of light companies of 
the fi<st Brigade, followed. The army then pro- 
ceed^ through the chaparral till within about 
three niiles of the FortT^^ word was passed to 
the rear that the erien^rere irf force in front, 
and in a selected pos^^^^.- There was no stop- 
ping for reflection or p^^gThP;. troops filed past 
the wagons, and depld^^^^¥hjers to the right j 
and leW^of thMm^^.ft^'^mh^^y- deployed 
when the ht^R^MgM^gfef peir The enemy 
were posted iipo'n ffre^^^f^^de of a ravine, their 
left guarded by a pond, with three batteries, contain- 
ing in all eight pieces of artillery, established one on 
the left, one in, and one on the right of the road. 
Upon the General's arrival, the gallant McCall 
was ordered to repair to the' spofesivhere his ad- 
vance guard was first fired upon, and " draw the 
fine off the enemy's batteries, so that the General 
might know where to place his.". That was what 



might be called a forlorn hope ;— they went and 
fearlessly drew and received their fire. 

The 5th and 8th Infantry were deployed ori 
the left of the road and the 3d and 4th on the 
right, with orders to advance as rapidly as pos- 
sible and fight the enemy wherever he might 
be. The thicket was almost impenetrable, 
and it was with the greatest difficulty that they 
could get through it. The Mexicans discovjjred 
or guessed at the General's disposition of his 
force, and poured into them grape and cannister 
shot from eight pieces of artillery, which were 
planted on the two sides of the road and en- 
trenched upon the margin of a pond impassable 
to men and horses. Their batteries were ah- 
sweied, but could not be silenced behind their en- 
trenchments. Owing to the dense chaparral, the 
regiments became much mixed, but fought not the 
less severely. Lieutenant R. Ridgely advanced 
with his battery and thre\y shells and schrapnel 
shot among the enemy. The enemy clung to 
their batteries with the greatest pertiriacity. The 
gallant Lieutenant, in one of his advances, had 
not yet unlimbered, when he was charged by a 



m 



•body of Jancers, who came dashing down upon 
hira like thunder j fortunately one of his pieces 
•was unlimbered, and Sergeant Keanes put a load 
of -cannister on top of a shell and fired it. Thjs 
scattered them all but four, who- came dashing 
along. Lieutenant Ridgely charged them in per- 
son, and drove them off ; all this time the balls 
'^were rattling like hailstones. Captain May rode 
back to the General and asked if he should 

. charge the enemy's battery in the road withi his 
squadron? "Charge, Captain, nolens voleus,"' 
was the reply, and away dashed the gallant fel- 
low and his squadron down the ravine ! The en* 

•eitiy poured a volley of grape into them, which 
killed Lieutenant Inge, and swfept away nearly 
the whole of his first platoon. On they went,;and 
drove the enemy from their pieces, and captured 
the battery 1 

In this charge, Iji the front rank, were Captain 
May himself, poor Inge and-Lt. Sackett. When 
May gave the word " charge /" Sackett's horse 
being a little the quickest, got the , start. In the 
midst of a shower of grape. May said to S., 
" Sackett, that's kot fair I you took the 
JUMP ON ME !" Lt. Sackett's horse was almost 
at that moment shot, and fell with him into a 
water hole. He fell upon the Lieutenant, who 
with -great difficulty disengaged himself with the 
loss of his sword. He took another horse and 
sword from a dragoon, and again joined in the 
fight. 

Gen. Vega was fighting in person at the Mexi- 
can batteries, and was just in the act of touching 
off a cannon when taken prisoner by ^ay. 

The 5th and 8th Infantry were then ordered to 
advance (being the nearest to the enemy's bat- 
teries) and bring off the pieces, but the enemy had 
reg^^ined them, and a desperate conflict hand to 
hand ensued, which lasted half an hour, when the 
Mexicans began to give back, and left the Ameri- 
cans in possession of their guns. At this time the 
whole of the Infantry became engaged, and the 
action continued almost without cessation untiL 
sunset, when the enemy were driven across ti^- 
Ria Grailde. " 



Battle of Resaca dj^tP^ni 



arni'on wenit the brave troops, yelling and firing, 
with the Mexicans in full run before them, utitil; 
they reached the. rivpr, and found the ,Gener 
oflicers and T^valry had outrun them, aii'H the 
mainder^f the Mexican army dispersed Wirou'^ 
■the chaparral As soon;as the route of jy^e ene^ 
my was reported to Gen. Taylor, he ordeeed th^ 
troops to return and encamp upon the f^ld ot 
battle. Thus ended the day, in the most briiJia^ 
victory of the age. Hearing of the action of the\ 
8th, the commanding General in Matamoras hadP 
sent over, to reinforce Arista, two veteran regi- 
ments numbering upwards of a thousand mcB 
who had been in twentv battles and never loa* 
6ne ;— so that in the actlbn of the 9th the Amerii 
can army were opposed by 7000, or nearly that.^: 
Col. Child's battalion iiaying been left with the 
baggage wagons, was not in the action. There 
was also a detachment seiit that niorning with the 
traia ;to Point Isabel — reducing Gen. Taylor's 
force engaged to something under 1800 men. 

Rules for Judging when the Eyes reqvire the 
assistance of Spectacles. 

1. When we are obliged to remove small ob- 
jects to a considerable distance from the eye in 
order to see them dist-inctly. 

2. If we find it necessary to get more light 
than formerly ; as, for instance, to place the can- 
dle between the eye and the object.* 

3. If, on looking at and attentively considering 
a near object, it fatigues the eye and becomes con- 
fused, or if it appears to have a kind of dimness 
or raist-before it. , ^ . ~ . ■ ' 

4. When small printed letters are seen to run 
into eacji other ,'. ^nd hence, by looking steadfast- 
ly on them appeat double or treble. 

5. If the eyes are so fatigued by a little exer- 
cise, that we arc obliged to shut them from time 
to time, so as t6 releive them' by looking at differ- 
ent objects. 

When all these circumstances cdiicur, or any 
%fi them separately takes place, it will be neces- 
sary to seek assistance from glasses, which will 
ease the eyes, and in some degree check their 



Innumerable instances among the meg of des/j tendency to become worse; whereas, if they be 



pe rate courage prove how determined /as thcar- 
my to conquer or die. 

The order wns now given to pursue the enemy, 



not assisted in time, the weakness will be consid-, 
erably increased, and the eyes be impaired by the 
• efforts they are compelled to exert. 



"* ^'' <^fij>tatn Walker .' 




33 



CAPJ?. SAMUEL H. WALKER. 

This officer is one of those rar6 spirits which 
a state of war will bring out from our citizen 
soldiers. His daring bravery in reaching Gen. 
Taylor's camp, and his previous conflict with the 
Mexicans, in which he lost nearly everVman un- 
der his command, have excited a strong desrie in 
the public mind to know more of him. 

He is a native of Maryland, and formerly re- 
sided in Washington, from*whence he went into 
the Florida .war, an^ distinguished himself for his 
intrepidity and daringl ■ " 

In 1842.he went to Texas, and after the Mexi- 
cans ha'd Mtoated from San Antonia, he crawled 
through I^Kramp one night to spy out their 
position, aWBid the attack upon them tlie next 
morning. I^^e|t joined the celebrated Mier 
expedition, MJ^^Teh prisoner by the Mexicans, 
led the attac^^ftheir guards in an effort ta 
escape, was taken to the city of Mexico, where 
«5 worked some time on the streets, and after 



twice narrowly escaping with his-life, final- 
ly reached Texas; ' * • , 

He then joined the Texan Revenue ser- 
vice, 4n which he remained until Gfen.' 
Taylor entered ^exas, on his way to Ccfif- 
pus Christi, yv^en he joined liim at the 
head of his company of Rangers. He 
was placed between ' the camp opposite 
Matamoras and Pbint Isabel, to keep open" 
the communication between them, and 
having ^earned the road was occupied bv 
the Mexicans, he started on the morhing 
. of the 28th of April last with his who}| 
force, about 75 men, to open a communis- 
cation wkh Gen. Taylor from Point Isabel. 
.After proceeding 12 miles he fell in with 
1500 Mexicans, who -appeared very sud- 
denly, and an engagement ensued, whicti 
lasted about 15 miwutes, when he Wasx 
compelled to retreat, and his troops being! 
raw, scattered in confusion. The. over-' 
wh|lming force of the enemy pursued him 
until within range of our guns, when they 
i'n,.turn retreated. The Mexicans lost about 
30 men. 

So far from being deterred by this dii- 
asterj Capt. Walker immediately volun- ' 
teered, if four men would join him, to proceed to 
Gen. Taylor's camp, at the risk of his life, and 
acquaint him with the situation of affairs at'PSThr^ 
Isabel, and bring back any orders he might have. 
A commmunication with Gen. Taylor beinw at 
this time very necessary. Major Munroe accepted 
the offer of Capt. Walker, and six men bravely 
volunteered to accompany him. The enterprise 
was considered very hazardous — almost fi^l- 
I hardy— but they reached Gen. Taylor's camp cw j 
the 30th, and were the first to acquaint hifti with " 
affairs at Point Isabeh, and he set out on. the nexi. 
day with his army to open the communication. '' % 

On the field of Palo Alto, and also in the battle 
of Resaca dela Palma, he did valuable service, 
for which he has been appointed captain in the U* -^ 
S. army. . ' ;^ 

After the capture of Matanioras," Captain \li^."'*' 
was sent out with a company of dragoons to obsgrve 
the Mexican army in their retr^^at, in whieh he 
had a skirmish, killing several,* bedsides taking 
twenty-five prisoners. C • ° 



M' 



i^**>^>' 



34 



Miscellany. 



Six Reasons for Planting an Orchard. 

1. Would you leave an inheritance for your 
children? . Plant an orchard. No other invest- 
ment of labour and money will, in tiie long run, 
pay so well. 

2. Would you make home pleasant — ihe abode 
of the social virtues? Plant an orchard. Nothing 
better promotes, among neighbours, a feeling of 
kindness and good wilt, than a treat of good iruit, 
often repeated. 

, .5. Would you remove from your children the, 
j^jngest temptations to steal ? Plant an orchard. ' 
"^thildren cannot obtain fruit at home, thfey are 

r^irery apt to steal it; and when they have learned 
to steal fruit, they are in a fair^way to learn to 
steal horses. 

' 4. Would you cultivate a constant feeling of 
tlfankfulness towards the great Giver of all good ? 
) Plant an eirchard. By having constantly before 

/ you one of the greatest blessings given to man, 
you mustbe hardened indeed, if you are not in- 

' fluenced bgr a spirit of humility and thankfulness. 

5. Would you have your children love their 
Some, respect their parents while livit^g, and ven- 
erate their memory when dead — in all their wan- 
derings look back upon the home of their youth 
as a sacred spot — an oasis in the great wilder- 
ness of the world? Then plant an orchard. 

6. In short, if you wish to avail yourself of the 
blessings of a bountiful Providence, which are 
within your reach, you must plant an orchard. 
And when you do it, see that you planUgood fruit. 
Don't plant crab-apple trees, nor wild plums, nor 
Indian Peaches. The b^st are the cheapest. 

' Edson Harknkss. 



and in a few days eftects a cure. The same med- , 
icine relieves croUp/=-^wever violent the attiack. i 



Cure for Summer Complaint.— Six drops of 
laudanum to half a tumblerful of rice-wa}er ; half 
a tumbler of the mixture to be taken every three 
or four hours. This simple remedy may be given 
to infants, children, or at any period of life, and 
has never failed to give immediate relief; and, if 
persevered in for a few days, to cure the disorder, 
however violent. ' ■■ 



Varnish for Jtlarness. — Take half a pound of 
India Rubber, one gltlton of spirits of turpentiue ; 
dissolve enough to make it into a jelly, by keep* 
ing alipost new milk warm ; ifcen fake equal quan- 
tities ctf good lioseed oil (in a hot state) and the 
above rkiixture, incofpo'-'^le them well on a slow 
fire, and it is fit for use. 



Boil yovr Mc^sses. — When molasses is used ' 
cooking, it is a i^y gre^ improvement to ^"V 
d skim it before yoiJ^se iTj it takes out the ^^i 
pleasant taste, and' makes tt almost as good -'^atS 
sugar. 1/ 



Hoarseness. — One drachm of freshly sc#|ped 
horseradish root, infused with four ounces of 
water, for two hours, with a close vessel, and* 
made into a syrup, wuh double its weight of vin- 
egar, is an approved remedy for hoarseness; a 
few tea-spoonfuls, it is said, have never been 
known tb fail in removing it. 



Cure for Whooping Cough. — A lljjll^poonful 

of castor oil to a tea-spoonful of molaafttes ; a tea- 

spo6nful of the mixture to be given whenever the 

.. cough is troublesome. It Rffords relief »* '^nrf. 



Remedy for Consumption.'— hWe temperately, 
avoid spirituous liquors, wear flannel next the skin, 
and take every morning half a pint of new milk 
mixed with a wine glassful! of the expressed juice 
of green hoarhound. One who has tried it says, 
" Fotur weeks' use of the hoarhound and milk, 
relieved the pains of my breast, caused me to 
breathe deep, long and free, strengthened and 
harmoniz-ed my voice, and restored me to a better 
state of Kealth than I had enjoyed for years." 

To Remove Bvg^, t^c.— The mo^ certain way 
to destroy bugs, is to put the bedstead* into a close 
room, and set fire to the following composition, 
placed ill an iron pot upon the hearth, having pre- 
viotJsly closed up the chimney, Jhen shut tho 
dooV ; let them remain all day : sujnhsur 10 parts, 
saltpetre, powdered, 1 part, mix. j|H|ti^ to open 
the door of the room five or six ho^^oefore you 
venture to go into it a second'i ' 



Whenever you buy or sellH^^ hire, make 
clear bargain, and never trust to '* we shan't disa 

crt**:abnilt (rifles."